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Emotional Intelligence In Leadership Essay

2590 words - 10 pages

Gupta, AneeshGRC 500: Emotional intelligence and leadership Essay 210/14/2014Emotional intelligence in leadershipWhat is the difference between great leaders and good leaders? It is not IQ or technical skills, its Emotional intelligence which is a group of five skills that are essential for the leaders to perform at their highest level and get maximum productivity. The five emotional intelligence skills are self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy and social skills. Everyone is born with certain levels of emotional intelligence skills. But we can strengthen these abilities through consistent practice, persistence and constant feedback from your supervisors and your coaches. Daniel Goleman first popularized this term emotional intelligence in 1995, later in 1998 he wrote an article in Harvard business review applying this concept to the business and management. He found through his research that traditional qualities associated with leadership such as determination, vision, intelligence and toughness are required for success they alone are not enough. Truly effective and successful leaders have a high degree of emotional intelligence which can bring about tremendous success in the career. Goleman (1998) asserted that "IQ and technical skills do matter, but mainly as threshold capabilities. Recent research clearly shows that Emotional Intelligence is the sine qua non of leadership. Without it, a person can have the best training in the world, an incisive, analytical mind, and an endless supply of smart ideas, but still will not make a good leader". In fact it has proved to be twice as important as other skills for jobs at all levels. Senior managers with high emotional intelligence capabilities have led their team's superior performances year after year across the globe. Moreover, leaders high in EI are the key to organizational success. Existing research also indicates that EI and intercultural consciousness have positive connotations that lead to effective cross-cultural leadership. EI refers specifically to the cooperative combination of intelligence and emotion that influence one's ability to succeed in coping with environmental demands and pressures.Mayer, Salovey and Caruso (2004) define emotional intelligence (EI) as "the capacity to reason about emotions, and of emotions to enhance thinking. It includes the abilities to accurately perceive emotions, to access and generate emotions so as to assist thought, to understand emotions and emotional knowledge, and to reflectively regulate emotions so as to promote emotional and intellectual growth. "In fact, EI has been identified as a real measure for distinguishing superior leadership skills and abilities (Pool & Cotton, 2004), and in recent years has become an important topic in social and organizational science. Moreover, the influence of Emotional intelligence on popular culture and the academic community has been rapidly growing (Emmerling and Goleman, 2003). Therefore, the...

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