Pursuit Of Freedom Depicted In Henrik Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler And Albert Camus’ The Stranger

1520 words - 6 pages

One’s own Freedom is what one desires to control the most in life. Yet in both Henrik Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler and Albert Camus’ The Stranger, Hedda and Meursault do not have this influence over themselves, because external factors force them to live their lives according to the society they live in. In both Hedda Gabler and The Stranger the main character are constantly reminded of the life they do not want through ordinary objects that typically represent life. By destroying them, Hedda and Meursault are trying to gain control of their lives and freedom. Eventually, the character realises that the only way they can truly gain this freedom is by the death of themselves rather than things around them.
In Hedda Gabler, Hedda becomes destructive towards ordinary objects which remind her of the life that she does not want. Ibsen chooses flowers, veranda doors and a manuscript as these objects because ironically, they symbolise life. These objects ultimately lead to the annihilation of her life for she believes death is the only outlet from her pregnancy- which would be the last factor to losing liberty. When Hedda enters the drawing room the day after her honeymoon, her first complaint is that “fresh air we must certainly have, with all these stacks of flowers” (Ibsen 19). These flowers are a welcome home gift from Mrs Elvsted, therefore symbolizing what Hedda does not want to be reminded of: her new marriage. The life of these flowers reminds her of her own new life, which she does not want, because it means becoming a ‘typically married woman’ rather than an independent one. Therefore at the start of the second scene, “most of the bouquets have been taken away” (Ibsen 36). By getting rid of the flowers, Hedda does not have the constant reminder that her life is boring, which is a dreadful thought for does not want to be controlled by her husband nor her home.
Being married for Hedda is like being under house arrest. The only taste of independence Hedda now has is through the veranda doors in the drawing room. Throughout the play, Hedda stands by the glass doors looking out; ogling at the life it represents- a life she longs for. For example, when Tesman reveals “how delighted Aunt Julia seemed to be- because you had come home looking so flourishing!” (Ibsen 41), Hedda is forced to think about her expected pregnancy after her honeymoon. Her immediate reaction is to stand by the glass doors and look outside; at a life without husbands, babies or anything that is dominating her. Nevertheless, these glass doors are not always ideal for Hedda because they leave her longing for something she will never obtain. In order to make the outdoors less appealing she compromises with herself that “[the leaves] are so yellow - so withered….Yes to think of it! Already in September” (Ibsen 21), convincing herself that the trees are only symbolising what she is destined for– ‘withered’ from growing old and bored. Therefore, by shutting the curtains or even shooting...

Find Another Essay On Pursuit of Freedom Depicted in Henrik Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler and Albert Camus’ The Stranger

Albert Camus' the stranger Essay

854 words - 4 pages L’Etranger; the stranger, the outsider. Through the story, Meursault seems to have no emotion or response to experiences and people. For this, he is seen as strange and an outsider. Meursault does not explain or focus on his emotion or relationship with people; he shows it through his aesthetic view of nature. Meursault explains all of the nature he comes across, but provides very little detail is regarding the people around him. This is done

Analysis of Henrik Ibsen's Hedda Gabler

1395 words - 6 pages The unmistakable dominance of men during the nineteenth century is an influential factor in the establishment of the central theme of Henrik Ibsen’s play Hedda Gabler. Due to Hedda’s lack of independence, she develops a strong desire for control. The direct relationship between Hedda’s marriage with George and her sly, manipulative characteristics is manifested by Ibsen during the work. Ibsen also exposes weakness in Mrs. Elvsted through her

The Absurd in Albert Camus’ The Stranger

1304 words - 5 pages Empathy makes us human yet not all humans are emphatic, In Albert Camus’ The Stranger a suspiciously apathetic man named Meursault comes to light as a criminal. However Meursault perpetrated a crime of passion, is that not absurd for a negligent man? In a simple view of Meursault life and philosophies the remission of human feelings is evident, and slightly frightening. In the stranger most of the events in the main characters life require an

Mortality in the Stranger by Albert Camus

1131 words - 5 pages Everyone will die. Meursault’s awareness of death contributes to his nonchalant attitude toward every death he witness or must endure in The Stranger. Death fails to upset Meursault. In The Stranger, Albert Camus emphasizes mortality in order to expose the ignorance humanity has towards the inevitable or unknown end. Camus’s emphasis on time accentuates Meursault’s indifference. This indifference reveals that death occurs inevitably

Albert Camus The Stranger: Existentialism and Absurdism

1263 words - 5 pages Existentialism is a philosophy that emphasizes the uniqueness and isolation of the individual experience in a hostile or indifferent universe, regards human existence as unexplainable, and stresses freedom of choice and responsibility for the consequences of one's acts. This philosophy is essentially the crux of the novel The Stranger and not only serves as one of the themes but probably the main reason Albert Camus wrote the book altogether

Existentialism in The Stranger by Albert Camus

1529 words - 6 pages In The Stranger by Albert Camus there are many points where Camus’s personal beliefs in existentialism are found. Camus showed his existentialistic beliefs by using his characters to make social commentaries on multiple different social institution, including marriage, time, and society itself. Camus uses all of his characters to show his social commentaries with specific characters going to show what existentialists believe are bad qualities of

Eyes in the Stranger by Albert Camus

1041 words - 4 pages In The Stranger, Albert Camus personifies eyes as a source of knowledge. Characters come upon knowledge through many different sources from touch to hearing. The knowledge gained through eyes can range from, self discovery to understanding events taking place. Eyes and knowledge all seem to be related to Meursault. Meursault’s ability to understand events and circumstances depends on his clarity of vision. Unlike other characters, Meursault’s

Indifference in Albert Camus' The Stranger

809 words - 3 pages Indifference in Albert Camus' The Stranger In Albert Camus novel, The Stranger (The Outsider), the main character Meursault displays a unique indifference to his surroundings and the world around him. It takes him a degree of time to come to terms with his indifference, but when he does he feels truly free from society's constricting bonds. He leads an apathetic lifestyle that is characterized by his constant lack of a definitive

Meursault in "The Stranger" by Albert Camus.

1281 words - 5 pages Meaning of LifeLife is wonderful, but also hard. We struggle to find the meaning in our lives, but we can not accomplish it. There are many kinds of thoughts or philosophies of life; some think that life is already determined by God or destiny when they were born, while others think that they decide what they do by themselves. In "the stranger", Albert Camus creates Meursault as a protagonist, who does not think about anything deeply. Because of

The Value of Life in The Stranger by Albert Camus

734 words - 3 pages The Value of Life in Camus' The Stranger (The Outsider)   In Albert Camus' existentialist novel “The Stranger,”the alienation of Meursault from society conveys to the reader the theme of the novel: In light of the lack of a higher deity, all promise of value rests in life itself. To express this theme, Camus develops Meursault’s persona, satirizes many institutions, alludes to religion, and creates many moral and ethical

The Stranger: Albert Camus and Existentialism

601 words - 2 pages The Stranger Analysis The opening line of The Stranger sets up the absurdity in Meursault.�He speaks about how his mom had "died today" or "yesterday maybe". He felt absolutely nothing and could only focus on what day she died. This kind of indifference goes on throughout the story, introducing to the reader what Meursault really thinks. The world sees him to have no meaning in a world filled with it. This

Similar Essays

Henrik Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler And Bertolt Brecht’s Mother Courage And Her Children

1192 words - 5 pages Henrik Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler and Bertolt Brecht’s Mother Courage and Her Children Henrik Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler and Bertolt Brecht’s Mother Courage and Her Children present two strongly defined female heroines whose actions not only adversely affect the other characters’ lives but also suggest a fundamental problem with their societies. Both playwrights establish the macroscopic view of society’s ills in the microscopic, individual

"The Theme Of It All" Comparing The Themes Of "The Plague" By Albert Camus And "Hedda Gabbler" By Henrik Ibsen

761 words - 3 pages The themes in the Albert Camus's, "The Plague", and "Hedda Gabler" by Henrik Ibsen are rather interesting. The central theme in "The Plague" is suffering itself, which crushes the people of Oran physically and spiritually. The plague, is described as force of evil, is the main cause of the suffering. The main theme for "Hedda Gabler" can be described as a conflict between society and the individual. She wants freedom, but she feels that she

The Stranger, Albert Camus Essay

1380 words - 6 pages Stranger, and the Czechoslovakian man’s story ends with the same fate, as once he returns to his small village, he is a stranger to all, even to his mother and sister. These two men were foils, yet similar in striking ways. The Czechoslovakian man lived out his dream, and his life ended due to the misdemeanor of trickery, while Meursault lived a dull, emotionless life, and his life ended due to the felony of murder. Works Cited Camus, Albert. The Stranger. Trans. Matthew Ward. New York: Vintage International, 1988.

Albert Camus' The Stranger Essay

1668 words - 7 pages Albert Camus' The Stranger What if the past has no meaning and the only point in time of our life that really matters is that point which is happening at present. To make matters worse, when life is over, the existence is also over; the hope of some sort of salvation from a God is pointless. Albert Camus illustrates this exact view in The Stranger. Camus feels that one exists only in the world physically and therefore the presence or