Quotes From The Book Or Movie:The Great Gatsby By F Scott Fitzgerald

1256 words - 5 pages

In the book the Great Gatsby there were many events that took place. This is part of the reason as to why there are two movies made after this book. In the movies some of the quotes are the same as the book, the same as all three, or completely different from both. These quotes can be based from the book by quotes that are only in the book, quotes that are all on their own, and quotes that are in all three.
Quotes that are only in the book are ones in the very beginning. Such as for example when Nick is describing East and West egg. He describes them in the book with clear detail, and he has conversations with Daisy when he goes over to the Buchanans house that are not in any of the movies. A few more examples of lines that are only on one movie and the book can be when Nick describes Chicago, and how everyone “painted their left rear tire black.” Is in the new movie and the book.
In the new movie from 2013, it has Nick going to the Buchanans house and he has a conversation in Toms trophy room, and in the other movie and the book there is not even a trophy room to have a conversation in. Not only that but in the very beginning of the movie it has Nick in a mental institution and is reflects back to that later on in the movie, and throughout the book, Nick is never in a mental institution, and never has any of the conversations that he does with a doctor in the other movie, or the book. Also in the beginning of the old movie it has Nick arriving to Tom’s house by boat and Tom and him talk on the polo field. Another thing only in the new movie is when Nick has his house filled with flowers he says “I bought cakes.” Also in the old movie Nick calls his place “rackrent.” Another thing that is different in all three but somewhat similar is when Meyer Wolfsheim shows off his teeth which are on his cufflinks in the book and in the old movie, and in the new movie they are on his tie. Meyer Wolfsheim says “I see you are looking at my cufflinks” in the old movie and in the book. But in the new movie he says “I see you are looking at my necklace.” Nick then asks Gatsby if Wolfsheim is a “dentist,” in the old movie. But in the book and new movie Nick asks if he is an “actor.”
There are more similarities between all three sources that share the same quotes. For example, each one starts off with Nick saying that his father always told him “all the people in the world didn’t have the advantages that you have.” Another example of a quote is the one where Myrtle keeps saying “Daisy,” and gets punched in the face. Also in all of them Nick goes to Gatsby's house, and gets an invitation, and after getting the invitation Nick proceeds to ask people if they also got an invitation. Then Gatsby comes over Nick says “like the grass,” and Gatsby says “What grass?” When Daisy gets to Nicks house she says “Is this absolutely where you live my dearest one.” Nick when he invites Daisy to his house calls his house “Castle Carroway,” this however is...

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