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Racial Injustice In A Raisin In The Sun, By Lorraine Hansberry And Sonny’s Blues, By James Baldwin

1939 words - 8 pages

"I have a dream that one day little black boys and girls will be holding hands with little white boys and girls." by Martin Luther King Jr, the dream that is still unfulfilled. White supremacy, black inferiority, Jim Crow law, segregation, racial terror, and racial inequality are the most common topics of American history. The quote of Martin Luther King Jr asserts the truth that racial injustice was in the vein of the American dream. He hopes someday that injustice, the view that African Americans are inferior will go away, and they will be treated equally like a full human being. The theme of racial injustice is prevalent in both “A Raisin in the Sun” by Lorraine Hansberry and “Sonny’s Blues” by James Baldwin stories. Both of the stories shows contrasting view on African American people living in fear of racial terrorism, physical harm, housing inequality, and dangerous life in segregated black neighborhood. However, they share similar views on racism in the form of economic oppression, and the experience of racial injustice in both of the author’s life which are expressed through their respective stories.
In the 1950s, racism was at its best and racial conflict was a common occurrence throughout the USA; black people were living in the fear of racial terrorism and physical harm. The determination of the white people to deny equal rights for the black people frequently resulted in to violent clashes, and that led to racial terrorism and physical attack on the black people. Thus, black people used to live in the fear of physical harm. In “A Raisin in the Sun”, the evidence of racial terrorism was prevalent, and it was explain in two occasions. Jacqueline Foertsch wrote in her “Against the "starless midnight of racism and war": African American intellectuals and the antinuclear agenda” essay that an anxious and distracted Walter Lee was reading the news paper, almost telling his Wife Ruth a loud that another bomb went off yesterday. Since the primary theme of this story is racial identity, approaching this keeping the theme in mind and the civil rights movement, anybody can easily assume that the “bomb”, Walter mentioned, was set off by the racist whites against a black neighborhood or church. Later in the story, another bomb attack reported in the paper which was much closer to home: a racially motivated attack against a black family integrating a white neighborhood. That event was announced by the Younger’s neighbor Mrs. Jonson, when they were ready to move to the all Whites Clybourne Park. Example scenarios from the above certainly provide the evidence of racial terrorism, and its fear among the Black community.
In contrast “Sonny’s Blues”, talks about the fear of direct physical harm. Narrator’s mother described that in a moonlit night some dunk white folks killed his uncle in front of his father which is a horrific act of racism. However, mama says, “I ain’t telling you to make you scared of bitter or to make you hate nobody. I’m telling...

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