Racial Prejudice: Past, Present, And Future "To Kill A Mockingbird" By Harper Lee

1153 words - 5 pages

Social issues are problems in our society for a variety of reasons. One reason is the fact that the issues can't be solved overnight. Social issues include alcohol and drug abuse, sexism, and most importantly racial prejudice. Racial prejudice is morally wrong because a person has a deep hatred for another just for their way of living or the color of their skin. Racial prejudice continues to decrease as time advances, but little progress has been made to completely cease racism. Racial prejudice in history created issues between races, but have been continually and gradually decreasing as new solutions have been made to abolish it once and for all.Major problems with racial prejudice were caused in the past by people who simply despised a certain race. One problem that arose was slavery. Slavery was one of the evils of racism because blacks were forced into poverty and to work for whites. Whites believed that they were superior toward the blacks and had the right to call them dirty names and kill them viciously. "Africans endured whippings and beatings, as well as diseases that swept through filthy cabins. Numerous Africans died from disease or physical abuse, some even committed suicide. They were auctioned off to the highest bidder, often being separated from loved ones and friends. Many lived on little food in small dreary huts. They worked long days and suffered beatings. Slavery was a lifelong condition, as well as a hereditary one." (Beck, 569) Another problem that occurred in the past was massacre of certain races called genocide. (Beck, 937) For example, the Holocaust was an example of genocide. Hitler despised the Jews and his helpers, the Nazis, killed over six million Jews cold-heartedly. "Never shall I forget the faces of the little children, whose bodies I saw turned into wreaths of smoke beneath a silent blue sky. Never shall I forget those flames which consumed my faith forever… Never shall I forget those moments which murdered my God and my soul and turned my dreams to dust…Never." (Beck, 939) The final topic is the injustice in which colored people experienced. Blacks, referred to as Negroes, in "To Kill a Mockingbird" were treated as if they were dirt in the presence of a white man. Tom Robinson was the prime example to how the colored were treated unjustly. Tom was defended very well and didn't deserve to receive a guilty verdict because he was not guilty of any crime he was convicted on. He was just convicted because the fact he was black, stated by Atticus, Scout's father, throughout the book. (Lee)On the bright side, racial prejudice isn't as bad as it once was. In the past, segregation kept blacks and whites from coming together as one. They couldn't use the same bathrooms, sit on the same side of the bus, and basically didn't have the same civil rights. Today, all ethnic groups and races come together in school, work, and in all types of entertainment. Although racism was very common in the past, the acts of...

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