Racial Tensions, Religious Axiom, And Apartheid In Alan Paton's 'cry, The Beloved Country'.

635 words - 3 pages

"Cry, The Beloved Country"Passion, love, despair, and the courage to look past a crime of unspeakable sorrow--all these themes and more encompass the beautiful South-African novel "Cry, The Beloved Country". The author, Alan Paton, through realistic dialogue and descriptive narrative images, allows the reader to truly feel the anguish and tragedy that is so inherent in his book. For one living in an entirely different time period and on a dramatically different continent it is especially difficult to enter into the heart of such a novel, but the characters, who are undoubtedly human, engage the reader's compassion and create a warmth that can neither be denied nor ignored.The setting of the book is South Africa in 1948, and addresses the issue of the many years of disunity among the Africans and the political instabilities of the Dutch and English imperial powers. The main characters are Stephen Kumalo, a Zulu preacher from the innocent country town of Ndotsheni, and James Jarvis, a rich, white man of prominence who lives in the sprawling Ixopo valley. These two men are forever linked on account of a crime of insurmountable gravity- a crime that takes the lives of two beloved only-sons to the grave. James Jarvis, whose son is renowned in his compassion for, and dedication to the improvement of the Negro, is shot to death in his Johannesburg home by Absalom Kumalo, the son of Stephen Kumalo. Now Kuamlo, who must deal with the certain execution of his son, comes head to head with Jarvis who takes bitterly the news of his son's death. Yet, in a time when the Native African is still savage in the eyes of a white man and a burden to their civilization, James Jarvis overcomes his hatred and extends his friendship and soul to a man who is of no societal importance and has nothing to offer in...

Find Another Essay On Racial Tensions, Religious Axiom, and Apartheid in Alan Paton's 'Cry, The Beloved Country'.

Lifestyles and leaving conditions of the black and white people in Alan Paton's 'Cry, the Beloved Country'.

884 words - 4 pages 'Cry, the Beloved Country' is set in 1946 in South Africa, where huge social and political changes had taken place at that time. It was first published in 1948 when Nationalist Party came to power and soon after that apartheid was introduced, establishing the separation of races in every aspect of daily life. Black people were refused voting rights and their role in the Parliament weakened. Alan Paton, in his novel had depicted the differences

Racial Morals in Cry, The Beloved Country

2134 words - 9 pages characters in the contemporary novel, on which, this paper is written. Both Steven and James have their own different views of apartheid. The character's views of racial segregation in the novel, "Cry, The Beloved Country," by Alan Paton, are reciprocated, resulting in new views of the black and white seclusion. Steven Kumalo struggled with both public and private feelings toward the whites who imposed the apartheid upon his people. Steven

"Cry, the Beloved Country" by Alan Paton.

1842 words - 7 pages compassion, both to friends and enemies. Alan Paton wrote the book with such strong biblical references to appeal to the people to follow biblical beliefs. Alan Paton calls for an end to racial injustice, misunderstanding and alienation of black and whites. "Cry, the Beloved Country" examines racial hatred and turmoil from a very different perspective than most people of Paton's time were used to. Because the setting and issues of this book are so

Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton

1301 words - 5 pages Alan Paton who was a South African author and anti-apartheid activist wrote the novel Cry, the Beloved Country, The novel publication in 1948 was just before South Africa institutionalized racial segregation under Apartheid. Paton addresses the destruction of the tribal system in South Africa due to white colonization by using the novel as a medium to illustrate is damage. Throughout the novel we are exposed to the numerous problems resulting

Biblical Allusion in Cry, the Beloved Country, by Alan Paton

1096 words - 4 pages The use of Biblical allusions and references is evident in Alan Paton's Cry, the Beloved Country. Against the backdrop of South Africa's racial and cultural problems, massive enforced segregation, similarly enforced economic inequality, Alan Paton uses these references as way to preserve his faith for the struggling country. By incorporating Biblical references into his novel, one can see that Alan Paton is a religious man and feels that faith

"Cry the Beloved Country" by Alan Paton

1018 words - 4 pages The Breakdown and Rebuilding of South African Society"...what God has not done for South Africaman must do."In the book, Cry, the Beloved Country, written by Alan Paton, some major conflicts follow the story from beginning to end. Two of these conflicts would be as follows; first, the breakdown of the ever so old and respected tribe; and second, the power of love and compassion and how that it can rebuild broken relationships. This story gives

Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton

767 words - 3 pages Cry, the Beloved Country is such a controversial novel that people tend to forget the true meaning and message being presented. Paton’s aim in writing the novel was to present and create awareness of the ongoing conflict within South Africa through his unbiased and objective view. The importance of the story lies within the title, which sheds light on South Africa’s slowly crumbling society and land, for it is the citizens and the land itself

Corruption In Cry, the Beloved Country, by Alan Paton

624 words - 2 pages Corruption is one of the most prevailing themes in Cry The Beloved Country, as well as in today’s world. In this story the author pictures many different characters in order to represent this wide spread illness of society, John Kumalo, Gertrude, Abasalom, just to name a few. Johannesburg itself is the summary of all that is wrong with cities of today. There is corruption and poverty. Crime runs rampant, and law-abiding citizens are forced to

Apartheid and The Future of South Africa in Cry, The Beloved Country

1223 words - 5 pages Arthur, Napoleon, and Msimangu, all characters from Alan Paton’s book, Cry, The Beloved Country, are used to share Paton’s points of view on the future of South Africa and the apartheid. Paton uses these characters to represent specific views; Arthur expresses clearly that the apartheid isn’t the right way to progress as a country, Napoleon exemplifies how Paton thinks people should take the anti-apartheid effort, and Msimangu explicitly

Perception of God's Presence in Paton's Novel Cry, the Beloved Country

764 words - 3 pages Theoretically, the Bible states that God is always present alongside his people. “Teach them to obey everything that I have taught you, and I will be with you always, even until the end of this age.” Matthew 28:20. In the novel, Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton, conveys a message that God’s presence is both acknowledged and ignored by the characters and a message to “love thy brother as yourself” (Matthew 19:19) through forgiveness in

"Cry, the Beloved Country", by Alan Paton. Stimulates a Change

1041 words - 4 pages The purpose of Cry, the Beloved Country, is to awaken the population of South Africa to theracism that is slowly disintegrating the society and its people. Alan Paton designs his work toexpress his views on the injustices and racial hatred that plague South Africa, in an attempt tobring about change and understanding. The characters that he incorporates within his story, helpto establish a sense of the conditions and hardships that the country

Similar Essays

Security And Independence In Alan Paton's Cry, The Beloved Country

1857 words - 7 pages One great paradox of human life is the balance between security and independence. Many people would say that they are self-sustaining, that they can make it on their own. The question is not always whether or not they can make it, but what the cost of their security is. Some value their personal freedom more than their security, for others it is the opposite. In “Cry, the Beloved Country” characters often wrestle with this issue. Every character

Alan Paton's Cry The Beloved Country

966 words - 4 pages Alan Paton's Cry the Beloved Country The book I have chosen to write about is Cry the Beloved Country. This book is about ambiguity and reconciliation. The main character in the story Stephan Kumalo has to deal his the struggle of his family, and trying to keep them together. The first few chapters of this book are place in a small town called Ndotshenti. But the action in this takes place in the largest city on South Africa

Alan Paton's Cry, The Beloved Country

1224 words - 5 pages “For it is the dawn that has come, as it has come for a thousand centuries, never failing. But when that dawn will come, of our emancipation, from the fear of bondage and the bondage of fear, why, that is a secret.” Alan Paton’s novel, Cry, the Beloved Country, can be understood as either a political novel or an artistic novel. Although this book involves political issues, the manor in which these concerns are conveyed throughout the story is

Racial Concerns In, "Cry, The Beloved Country", By Alan Paton.

1476 words - 6 pages Racial Concerns in Cry, the Beloved CountryIn the story, Cry, the Beloved Country, by Alan Paton, depicts about Ablsom Kumalo's search for his son in Johannseburg, and he later knew that his son killed white man. His son, Ablsom, is convicted for guilty charges, and that shows that white society is filled with discrimination and injustice. Yet, this murder had brought Stephen Kumalo and James Jarvis, a black and white man together. James was the