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Racism In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain

1307 words - 6 pages

FCAs
1. Assignment is done and typed-10 pts Samantha Archer
2. At least 4 pages-10 pts January 13,2014
3. Topic sentences connecting thesis-10 pts Block D
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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

There is a major argument on whether Mark Twain’s novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a racist novel or not and if it should be taught in schools. A great amount of people found this book to be demeaning to certain races and thought that Twain used racist words quiet loosely in this book. It was also thought the book should be banned from school reading lists because of the racial contexts. While others found The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn a great book that reveals the true racism that happened during the pre-Civil War era. This is novel is about a young troublesome named Huckleberry Finn who runs away from his alcoholic abusive father with a black slave named Jim that ran away from his owner Miss Watson. Huck and Jim create this unlikely friendship on their way to a better life full of freedom. This novel Huckleberry Finn should continue to be taught in schools because it shows realism, satire, and a friendship between Huck and Jim.
One reason why Huckleberry Finn is not a racist novel is because Twain uses a great amount of realism throughout the whole book. An example of realism that Twain uses is that slavery and racism is constantly talked about throughout the whole story. Its constantly brought up being during that the time period slavery and racism was very popular. In the story Miss Watson shows an example of realism when she sells her slave Jim down to Orleans. “ I hear old missus tell de wider she gwyne to sell me down to Orleans but she didn’t want to, but she could git eight hund’d dollars for, me, en it’ uz sich a big stack o money she couldn’t resist” (Twain 43). The quotes shows realism in it because during the time setting of Huckleberry Finn it was common for people in the south to sell their own slaves for money. Literary Critics constantly say “ The n-word is spoken there a number of times” (Powell, 5). Of course the word “nigger” is spoken a number of times throughout the story because Twain is showing the real dialect that was spoken during that time period. Twain is reveal to readers the common vocabulary that was used in the 1800s . Constantly throughout the story of Huckleberry racist opinions are spoken from different people. For example Huck’s father, Pap says blacks should not have the right to vote yet alone be free. This is an example of realism because people use to believe that blacks should not have same rights that white people had. In the time period that Huckleberry took place racism and slavery was common but throughout all the racism and slavery that is seen in the novel. Twain uses techniques to poke fun at some of those.
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