Racism In The Short Stories Essay

2388 words - 10 pages

Often we read stories that tell stories of mixing the grouping may not always be what is legal or what people consider moral at the time. The things that you can learn from someone who is not like you is amazing if people took the time to consider this before judging someone the world as we know it would be a completely different place. The notion to overlook someone because they are not the same race, gender, creed, religion seems to be the way of the world for a long time. Racism is so prevalent in the two stories that I am choosing to write about. Country Lovers by Nadine Gordimer, and The Welcome Table by Alice Walker two very similar, but different stories that tell about the struggles ...view middle of the document...

This is the time that these same playmates begin to call them missus and baasie little master.
We are first introduced to one of our main characters Paulus Eysendyck who it is described by third person point of view it did not matter that our second character Thebedi was now simply one of the crowd of farm children wearing his sisters’ old clothing. Paulus was still oblivious to the racial divide because he brought her various gifts when he came home for Christmas holidays. The gift exchanges were done in secret because of the other children down at the kraal. A couple of years passed and now Paulus is fifteen and around the height of six feet tall and a strapping young fellow who was learning to tease and fondle quite intimately the girls of farmers of the same social class as his father. Even though all of this had gone on he still brought young Thebedi hoop earrings home. She had to lie to her father that the missus gave them to her because by this time it was forbidden of the comingling of races. The other girls in the kraal were told about her sweetheart that nobody knew about we also learn about Njabulo who wishes he could provide her with some of those same things.
As the story progresses we learn of the secret rendezvous that Paulus and Thebedi would have simply an urge that each followed on their own. (Gordimer, 1975) The meeting place was the dried up river bed they once played at as kids. Paulus told of his travel tales, school and punishments. One summer afternoon we see they are back at the same river bank except that water is now flowing and Thebedi has gone for a dip in the water and Paulus is admiring her and
the description of the girls he swims with at school are no comparison to this dark skinned girl he is now watching the water bead of her dark legs. The attraction between the two is finally captivated by them sharing an intimate moment by the bank which carries on often. The time passes and they have various meeting times and places such as the Eysendyck house in the guest rooms. The story begins to change when Njabulo asks her father for her to be his bride, nor did she pass along the information to Paulus that she was thought to be carrying a baby. The plot, however thickens when Njabulo even though he made love to Thebedi before marriage a very light baby was given birth to.
Mr. Eysendyck arrives home from college and his first stop is to see Thebedi now that he has learned of her having a baby. He sees the infant for the first time and the narrator tells of him almost seeing a reflection of his own self. Paulus is filled with tears, anger, and self-pity. He asks if the she had been by the house with the baby and she replied “Never”. After this the baby is killed by Paulus as Thebedi stands outside. She give testimony at the preparatory examination as Paulus is brought up on murder charges. Thebedi changes her story at the actual trial to which Paulus is acquitted. In an interview we see that Thebedi in her own...

Find Another Essay On Racism in the Short Stories

The Perverse in the Short Stories of Edgar Allan Poe

3382 words - 14 pages Edgar Allan Poe is perhaps the best-known American Romantic who worked in the Gothic mode. His stories explore the darker side of the Romantic imagination, dealing with the grotesque, the supernatural, and the horrifying. He defined the form of the American short story. As one might expect, Poe himself eschewed conventional morality, which he believed stems from man's attempts to dictate the purposes of God. Poe saw God more as process than

Survival in Three Short Stories Essay

874 words - 3 pages The effort to survive and to see another day has always been a problem since the first men walked the Earth. There are many obstacles that make living day-to-day a harsh struggle and many reasons why some fail to meet the expectations of this struggle. Some reasons of why people fail to thrive in life is captured vividly in the three short stories “The Waters of Babylon” by Stephen Vincent Benét, “How to Build a Fire,” by Jack London, and “The

The Main Theme in Edgar Allen Poe's Five Short Stories

1806 words - 8 pages Edgar Allan Poe wrote five short stories that are very popular. “The Black Cat,” “The Cask of Amontillado,” “The Fall of the House of Usher,” “The Raven,” and “The Tell-Tale Heart” are the stories that I found similar. Poe’s stories were written between 1839 and 1846. All of them are similar in a way that they involve madmen. These men think they are sane, but they end up doing horrible things. Poe’s writing style is very dark. We can consider

Gendered Home in the Short Stories of Shashi Deshpande

3461 words - 14 pages of home. The gendered nature of home has been a major theme in the short stories of Indian women writers. Their writings are evocative of the frustrated lives of women inside the patriarchal home and also about how women go about resisting it. In this article, the short stories of Shashi Deshpande (b.1938) would come under close scrutiny as they explore the ‘silent’ but simultaneously creative and fulfilling lives of Indian women belonging to

The Feminist Struggle in Katherine Mansfield’s Short Stories

2840 words - 11 pages ). Mansfield’s short stories, “The Garden Party” and “Miss Brill”, represent the feminist struggle to identify traditional patriarchy as an inherent caste system in modernity. This notion is exemplified through the social bonds women create, the naïve innocence associated with the upper classes, and the purposeful dehumanization of women through oppressive patriarchal methods. By examining the female characters in “The Garden Party” and “Miss Brill”, it is

The Breakdown of Relationships in Kate Chopin's Selected Short Stories

3094 words - 12 pages relationships fail or succeed may seem like a great mystery to those involved. The factors in the short stories of Kate Chopin, "The Kiss", "The Story of an Hour", and "The Storm", do in fact lead to the failure of relationships. When coming together in a relationship, husbands and wives usually develop their own natural, human plan for marital happiness. The couple's separate plans are based on the unique personalities and personal differences of each

How are the gender roles represented in Australian Short stories? (from The Penguin Best Australian Short Stories) Comparing three stories, how do they change over time?

805 words - 3 pages The representation of Gender roles is an issue expressed in "The Penguin best Australian Short stories" collection. The issues of gender are expressed through gender inequality, stereotypical gender roles, the economic basis of marriage, and the expectations of women. These beliefs and their changes as the stories became more modern are presented through the stories, 'Monsieur Caloche', "The Lottery' and "A Gentleman's Agreement.The

Similarities and Differences in Two Short Stories

1504 words - 6 pages vindication of the rights of women, and an author whose literary works were controversial and unappreciated until many years later” (TheStorm&FeministPhilosophy.com). This description of Chopin’s work is distinctly evident in one of most distinguished short stories “The Storm”. Sarah Orne Jewett was born on September 3, 1849. Jewett began her writing career dedicated to writing poems and short stories for children; eventually she turned her

Innocence Is Bliss in O'Connor's Short Stories

1422 words - 6 pages There’s is no freedom from the post-lapsarian world. The attributes of this fallen world are very prominent in O’Connor’s short stories. However, she chooses not to include all of her characters into this nutshell. Instead, she gives her female characters innocence and monist ideals. Ironically, O’Connor isolates them from the rest and gives them a pitiful image as she goes on to mock their ways. The obliviousness and innocence of the

Southern Culture in American Short Stories

1601 words - 6 pages Each of the authors in the three short stories, Andreas Lee's "Anthropology," Alice Walker's "Roselily," and William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily" use a Southern background to show how people are ingrained to their past, and fearful of change. They each use Southern culture to show how it develops the personalities and inner feelings of the characters. Each story shows the fear and struggle of people who have made a change, or who would like to

The Short Stories of Gabriel Garcia Marquez

978 words - 4 pages The Short Stories of Gabriel Garcia Marquez Short story writer. Novelist. Journalist. Political activist. Nobel Prize winner. Most beloved of 20th century Latin American authors, Gabriel Garcia Marquez was born on March 6, 1928, in the small coastal town of Aracataca, Colombia. He published his first story, "The Third Resignation," in 1947 and began studying law and journalism. His first novel, Leafstorm, was published in 1955, the same

Similar Essays

Reflections Of Racism As Portrayed In Short Stories

971 words - 4 pages Reflections of Racism as Portrayed in Short Stories Racism, especially against black people, has been a tragic part of American history. It shaped the events of the past, and has molded the world in which we live in today. Not only is it evident in history, but also in the literature that we read. Novels and short stories have reflected the racism of its time.Racism is a historical fact of American life, and its early basis was the continuing

Interpreting Choy's And Taylor's Short Stories: Issues Of Modern Racism And Prejudice

1327 words - 5 pages States of America, dark skinned individuals were used as slaves for manual labour and were stripped of their rights and freedoms by the Americans because of the racist attitudes that were present in America. Although racist and prejudice attitudes have weakened over the decades, they persist in modern societies. To examine a modern perspective of prejudice and racism, Wayson Choy’s “I’m a Banana and Proud of it” and Drew Hayden Taylor’s “Pretty Like

Humankind In The Three Forster Short Stories

2239 words - 9 pages Humankind in The Three Forster Short Stories Forster is writing in a time when society was changing dramatically. When rural life in the countryside was leaving while urban life was starting. While this is happening mechanically it was also happening in a mental aspect and the way people live and look at life is changing. What Forster sees is dangerous results. He was probably writing in a time like the Industrial

Suspense In Short Stories Essay

995 words - 4 pages Suspense is one of the most important elements of storytelling. When one reads a story the setting is a very important key to creating suspense for the reader this is very crucial for short stories because they have a shorter period for the reader to get intrigued. Many of today’s modern world readers prefer a fast moving intense drama, which is filled with plenty of character drama. This in terms will grab the reader’s attention as well as