Racism In To Kill A Mockingbird By Harper Lee

1000 words - 4 pages

Racism is evident in the book To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Throughout the story whites are constantly challenging blacks, and vice versa, because blacks want to be seen as equals and not as a lesser race.
Racism has been in the United States since the beginning of time, when the whites first settled here they were racist against the Indians, they beat killed and cleared out their tribes, bust because they wanted their land. Then you see a different form of racism between blacks and whites, it was present just because of skin color; you see segregation between the two races up until the 1950s when schools became integrated, but the racism was still there. Whites refused to sit ...view middle of the document...

One of the members of her church has the nerve to come up to them and say, "I wants to know why you bringn' white chillun to a nigger church...they got their church , we got our'n. It;s our church ain't it Miss Cal?" (pg119). It's a church, where judgement should be the last thing someone should be doing there. Scout and Jem are children! And the people at this church are treating them like they're some kind of alien. These kids didn't do anything to these people, and yet they are to racist to peacefully let them go to church. Thats just how they reacted when white children went to a black church, now when a woman tempted a negro- the town almost lost it; they said, "she was white, and she tempted a Negro. She did something that in our society is unspeakable: she kissed a black man. Not an old uncle, but a strong young, Negro man. No code mattered before she broke it, but it came crashing down on her afterwards" (pg204). This is one of the worst things you could do at this time is be a young white woman and try to seduce a black man. This is a crime punishable by death, not for the white woman, of corse not! But for the innocent black man who was just trying to help but ended up being in the wrong place at the wrong time. In this case the black man is Tom robertson who ended up dying because a white woman kissed him; and as for the white woman, Mayella Ewell, she will walk away solely because of her race. Lastly racism is evident between Jem and Scout, yes they are children, and yes they don't understand things to the extent that adults do, but they still know that racism is present, even in...

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