Racism: The Artificial Category Of Race

1791 words - 7 pages

Racism: The Artificial Category of Race

THESIS: Scientists and other intellectuals recognize the modern concept of "race" as an artificial category that developed over the past five centuries due to encounters with non-European people. Even though people still attempt to organize humans into categories according to their race, these categories have been shown to have no scientific basis.

The term "race" is a modern concept. It's definition has adopted radically new meaning over the past few centuries. Currently, the term is used to characterize differences among human groups. According to the Oxford English Dictionary the term "race" in 1512 is "a group or class of persons, animals, or things, having some common feature or features." Today, Oxford's definition is quite different: "a local geographic or global human population distinguished by genetically transmitted characteristics and/or any of the major biological definitions of man distinguished by physically evident features, for example, Caucasian, Negroid, and Mongoloid." This definition is a result of regular interaction with non-European people. The Europeans began to explore other lands, thus creating the idea that some people are different than them and should not be under the same category as them.

The constant interaction with groups of people who’s lifestyles were very different led Europeans to believe that they were a different "kind" of people. Scientists worked on and created many different ways to classify the different people they found. This unrefined method of categorization was the origin of a new culture-oriented taxonomic system for human beings. The system is based on the "Great Chain of Being," which is a way of classifying things according to a hierarchy. The awareness of perceptible race differentiation intensified as Europeans interacted with Native Americans, colonized North America, and established the slave trade. Classification resulted in the word "race" being an indication of human species, kind, variety, and type. Thousands of other systems were developed, designed to classify humans to a "race" according to their skin, brain size, violent behaviors, and intelligence (Holli 132). Physical characteristics, such as hair
textures and color, nose, lips, and muscles, sexual habits, morals, and religion were also considered as criteria to assign a "race" to a human being. Fundamental systems based mainly on physical characteristics allowed scientists to justify racial group placement.

Scientists and other intellectuals recognize the modern concept of "race" as an artificial category that developed over the past five centuries due to encounters with non-European, even though scientists attempted to organize humans into categories according to their race, they have been demonstrated to be unscientific in this century.

The definition of "race," is a group of people who have certain well-marked characters in common, evolved from terms including...

Find Another Essay On Racism: The Artificial Category of Race

The Ethics of Artificial Life Essay

1926 words - 8 pages harder to answer, and is in ways more pointing out something that we must be aware of and watch studiously as the rise of artificial life unfolds. This question is likely unanswerable until the advent of true artificial life, in much the same way as predicting the response of a large society to any other quantum leap forward in technology, such as industrialization and the internet, has been impossible. To attempt to predict how the human race will

The Ethics of Artificial Intelligence Essay

2528 words - 10 pages It is a phrase that inspires awe of the accomplishments of the human race. It is a phrase that inspires fear for the mankind. Artificial intelligence has the potential for great, wondrous things, as well as those that are horrid and terrible. Writers have often played on this fear of other forms of intelligence – this fear of the unknown – and nothing can be worse than being outsmarted and surpassed by one’s own creation. Artificial intelligence

The Controversy of Artificial Intelligence

1495 words - 6 pages Throughout its history, artificial intelligence has always been a topic with much controversy. Should human intelligence be mimicked? If so, are there ethical bounds on what computers should be programmed to do? These are a couple of question that surround the artificial intelligence controversy. This paper will discuss the pros and cons of artificial intelligence so that you will be able to make an educated decision on the issue.What is

The Rise of Artificial Intelligence

2952 words - 12 pages The Rise PAGE \* MERGEFORMAT 11 The Rise of Artificial IntelligenceLiving in a world in which artificially intelligent robots have become part of our everyday life where not only they clean the house, cook or deliver our mail, but also write the essays, do the presentations, the jobs instead of us. Is this kind of world merely a dream that can only exist in the science fiction movies or is it in our future? Are computers or other kinds of

The Failure of Artificial Intelligence

1352 words - 5 pages The reality of AI, or artificial intelligence, is generally regarded to be a teleological fait accompli: sooner or later, they argue, computers will actually think. Of course, with the backing of many a member of MIT's Media Lab and corporate IT departments anywhere, this conclusion is unquestionable. I would here like to avoid downplaying the great strides made in recent years by computer technologists in promoting this evolutionary vision. But

The Mark of Race

1106 words - 4 pages notions and the individual fulfill the stigma. But, race in America equates power. To suppress a person after finding out information about them is difficult. The quickest way is to use past history about an entire race, place someone in their ‘respective’ category, and continue to act superior. As stated in the film, a story of race was created to justify how all men are not treated equal (Adelman and Strain 2003). This statement resonates

The Crucible of Race

1685 words - 7 pages Some subjects are so complex that they require fresh interpretations every generation as new material emerges and historical methodologies and viewpoints change.Since the civil rights upheavals of the 1950's and 1960's, the subjects of black history and race relations have been probed by a virtual army of historians. The total corpus of literature on this topic has indeed grown so large that Joel Williamson does not include a bibliography in The

Importance are media to the formation of youth as a social category.

1913 words - 8 pages Media is vital in the formation of youth as a social category. It is a global phenomenon that influences social life far beyond music and entertainment industries. The development of media in relation to youth will be examined using hip-hop as a primary illustration. This essay will be informed based on Foucault's post-modern theory of the death of the author.The distinction of youth as a significant social category is without a consideration a

The Applications and Making of Artificial Diamonds

1690 words - 7 pages The Applications and Making of Artificial Diamonds Diamonds are very unique. Their hardness and beauty have enticed people for many years. Now some of the same attributes that make them appealing also make them useful. To understand these attributes the chemistry of carbon is very important. This unique chemistry is what makes them so hard to make. Much research has gone into the making of diamonds and this has led to many successes

The Morality and Utility of Artificial Intelligence

4503 words - 18 pages The Morality and Utility of Artificial Intelligence Douglas R. Hofstadter, in his work Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid, remarks that one may contend that Artificial Intelligence is born of a machine’s ability to perform any task that had been previously confined to the domain of humans (601). However, a few sentences later, the author explains Tessler’s “Theorem” of progress in AI: “once some mental function is programmed

The Development of Racism

1332 words - 5 pages collectives, defined in terms of natural and/or cultural attributes, and ranks these attributes in a hierarchy of superiority and inferiority" (Blum 5). It can be directly linked to the past and still, centuries later, serves as a painful reminder that race continues to be one of the "sharpest and deepest divisions in American life" (Loewen 138). What were the causes of racism? How did it develop historically? In order to answer those complex

Similar Essays

The Category Of The Individual Essay

4923 words - 20 pages , categories blur the reality of experience. An individual is unable to experience life only according to one aspect of his/her life. For example, a woman may understand life through her perspective as a woman, but her experience is not defined only by her gender. She must take into account her race, class, geographical location, etc. Categories may contribute to one's identity, but no single category is capable of determining everything about one's

The Artificial Nigger: Truths Behind Racism

1469 words - 6 pages In O'Connor's "The Artificial Nigger" the essences of prejudice and degradation are captured to a great extent. Reality shows us with needless consistency people in a need to feel better about themselves only achieve it by being better than someone else. Therefore every opportunity at hand, including racism, is taken advantage as a form of gratification. Mr. Head, the grandfather, is an example of one of these people. He is in

Race Based Medicine A Form Of Racism

2691 words - 11 pages horrific situations of racism in the past that resulted in slavery and genocides throughout the world. Race as relating to humans can be defined as “a family, tribe, people, or nation belonging to the same stock” or “a class or kind of people unified by shared interests, habits, or characteristics” or even “a category of humankind that shares certain distinctive physical traits” (Merriam Webster Online). With all of these varying definitions

The Category Of The Individual Foucault And The Self

4940 words - 20 pages ; (Moraga 232). Moraga realizes that as a result of the world we live in and its need for a system of categorization in order to maintain order, we are all subject to being judged by our race. White is a race category that denies experiences just as biracial is; neither category embraces the individual's culture, or in Moraga's case, the multiple cultures that she has experienced. To be categorized as white is not a reflection of a world