Radio Interview Script: Ridley Scott And Aldous Huxley Discussing The Significance Of "Blade Runner" And "Brave New World"

1114 words - 4 pages

J: Today I'd like to discuss how context shapes the values reflected in texts, and to help me out, I've invited two gentlemen I believe to be experts on the matter. I'm sure the listeners are as excited as I am, so without further delay, allow me to introduce Aldous Huxley and Ridley Scott!H: Good morning.S: Hi John.J: Lets start with the basics Mr. Huxley. How do you believe your work was influenced by the context in which it was written.H: Oh, immensely John. The post-war decade was a turbulent time. Technological milestones were almost a daily ritual. With all the new medical breakthroughs, the talking pictures, automobiles, it was all so novel and wonderful. And the production lines made it all accessible. It meant a new life for our entire society.J: But judging by the satirical tone of your work, you weren't too impressed?H: To be honest John, the growing dependence on these scientific luxuries frightened me. Our society was losing its link with the natural world. I merely explored the implications should such a trend continue. Through sterile imagery "but finding only the glass and nickel and bleakly shining porcelain of a laboratory" and the notion of the mass production of humanity itself "Bokanovsky's process" I've satirized an over-dependence on science. This is reinforced through Lenina's dependence "I wish I had my soma" and through recurring references to artificial simulation of natural human experiences "Violent passion surrogate" "pregnancy surrogate". Science was beginning to play a dominant role in our daily lives, and yes, the extent of this did concern me.J: Fascinating. Now over to you Mr. Scott. To what extent do you believe context shapes the values reflected in your film?S: I have to agree with Mr. Huxley and say the values explored within any text are largely defined by the context in which it was composed. Take Blade Runner for example. The 1980s was a time of corporate dominance and genetics moved forward in leaps and bounds, with cloning just around the corner. Unfortunately, all this came at the expense of the environment. Scientists and CEOs were sorely lacking in responsibility.J: I've noticed that you made use of wide camera angles to reveal a desolate over-developed landscape, and throughout the film the only lighting is artificial. Did you do this to convey any particular message?S: I tried to make the 2019 vision of LA as symbolic as possible. The towering corporate offices reflect the trend of over-development, while the total absence of anything natural reflected the damage corporations inflicted upon the environment. Through artificial lighting I created a desolate and hopeless mood. The sense of detachment from anything natural is reinforced through artificial animals, and bonsai trees, an example of nature dominated my man.J: Any particular reason for such a bleak landscape?S: Like Mr. Huxley I explored the consequences of the path my society had set out upon. Corporate pursuits resulted in severe...

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