This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Ralph's Leadership In William Golding’s Lord Of The Flies

1420 words - 6 pages

Ralph's Leadership in William Golding’s Lord of the Flies

Ralph, the elected leader of the group of British boys in William Golding’s Lord of the Flies, strives to take the civilized society to which he is accustomed and apply it to society on the island on which he and the other boys are stranded. As leader, this task seems simple – tell the other boys what they each need to do and expect them to do it. Ralph fails to realize the difference between the rest of the boys and himself.

The world is in the middle of a massive war, a war in which the threat of the atomic bomb looms prominently. In fear of losing all its future fighting force, Britain sends a group of its schoolboys on an airplane to safety. Before reaching its destination, though, an enemy fighter plane shoots down the boys’ plane. The plane crashes into a forest on a remote island and, as a result, the pilots die. This group of schoolboys jumps from a society in which adults direct them to act properly to one in which there is no authoritative figure to give them orders. Back in Britain, adults train the boys to obey them and follow their lead. They act appropriately because of the threat of punishment for disobedience. Even later in the novel, once things begin to fall apart, Golding writes, “Here, invisible yet strong, was the taboo of the old life. Round the squatting child was the protection of parents and school and policemen and the law” (62). As the story progresses, though the boys go so far as to participate in savage acts such as killing each other, in the end, they realize that they conducted themselves immorally.

Stranded on the island with a bunch of boys and no adults, Ralph quickly takes charge and demands the election of a leader of the boys. He emerges as the clear choice for leader. Not only does he have archetypal “fair hair” (7), but Golding also explains, “but there was a stillness about Ralph as he sat that marked him out: there was his size, and attractive appearance; and most obscurely, yet most powerfully, there was the conch” (22). The boys choose Ralph as leader not only because of his height, but most importantly, because he possesses the conch. The boys recognize Ralph as the one who gathered them together by blowing the shell-like conch and choose him as their leader.

Things work out well for Ralph at first. He takes charge over the boys and tells them what they need to accomplish for rescue and survival. The ways of the organized and civil society he learned back home in Britain show through in the method he uses in explaining the tasks the boys needed to complete. He approaches things from an organized, logical, and practical manner and thinks first about being rescued. Immediately after being elected leader and satisfying Jack, another prominent character in the novel, by allowing him to choose the task of his choir boys, Ralph says, “If this isn’t an island we might be rescued straight away. So we’ve got to decide if this is an...

Find Another Essay On Ralph's Leadership in William Golding’s Lord of the Flies

Leadership in The Lord of the Flies by William Golding

939 words - 4 pages In the book the Lord of the Flies, there are many people which embody the persona of the best leader. However, the person who best embodies the quality is Ralph. This can be proven because of 3 reasons. In the duration of the story, he shows many defining characteristics that reveal his great leadership qualities. However there are 3 qualities that stand out and are the qualities which will be talked about in depth. These three qualities are the

William Golding’s Lord of the Flies: A Laboratory Demonstration of Human Behaviour Sans the Restraints of Civilization”

1244 words - 5 pages Nobel Laureate Sir William Golding’s Lord of the Flies(1953) has become a compulsory stop on the route of any surveyor of the English novel published in the second half of the twentieth century. During an atomic war, an aeroplane carrying a group of young English school boys is shot down and the party is marooned on an island in the Pacific. The boys, with no elders around, initially try to organize themselves by laying down rules and calling

Disturbed Characters in Shakespeare’s ‘Macbeth’ and Golding’s ‘Lord of the Flies

1092 words - 5 pages In Shakespeare’s ‘Macbeth’ and Golding’s ‘Lord of the Flies’, the portrayal of disturbed characters differentiates. The story of Macbeth was set in medieval Scotland during an era where fear and violence dominated the world; a society where clans fought for power and craved the title of being the next king. In the play Macbeth is a glorified solider that meets his fate after being led astray by selfish ambitions. Similarly, Golding’s experience

Vicious Leadership in Lord of The Flies

1445 words - 6 pages his composure and let his true nature, that is to let the darkness in him take over, it would be the end of the hard built nation. The Lord Of The Flies, is a good example of what will happen to a society when one let it's true nature take over. It shows how a group of English boys tries to survive and maintain a civilized society, that is till one of them becomes power craze. Their small, pleasant world starts to dismantle, when one of the main

Thesis: William Golding's Lord of the Flies, the littleuns leave Ralph's democratic government to establish a Hobbesian commonwealth under the guidance of Jack

922 words - 4 pages Thesis: William Golding's Lord of the Flies, the littleuns leave Ralph's democratic government to establish a Hobbesian commonwealth under the guidance of Jack.In society, the need for government arises as human tendencies become evident. Following Hobbesian principles, when a human lives without governmental principles, they are in a natural state. In a natural state, there are no laws to restrain mankind, and destruction along with the

Leadership: Lord Of The Flies

1672 words - 7 pages Comparison of Leaders Throughout the novel Lord of the Flies, William Golding is able to touch on the many aspects of our civilization through the various characters he creates. Leadership plays a very important role in the novel as it does in real life because the characters need to feel some sense of security in order for them to survive. The two main leaders in the story, through their similar and different leadership characteristics and

Leadership (Lord Of The Flies)

482 words - 2 pages . In the book Lord of the Flies I thought Jack was a good leader. He was the leader of the hunters, not only did he know how to hunt well and all that, but he also was willing to help out the other hunters and he was the type of person who would hunt until he had food to bring home. What I am saying is that if I were on the island I would feel comfortable with Jack leading the group because he could teach everyone how to hunt and cook what they

Ignorance and Bad Leadership in Lord of the Flies by William Golding

1665 words - 7 pages become less and less what they had hoped to be. Lord of the flies by William Golding is a great example of this. Golding argues that where there is a gain in power with bad leadership, that there is a loss of identity. In Lord of the Flies, A few boys arrive on a plane after it had crashed because of a war that was taken place at the time of the plane crashing. The basic synopsis is that they are trying to be rescued. The boys recollect after

Lord Of The Flies Leadership

795 words - 4 pages In the book Lord of the Flies by William Golding, there are many leadership traits shown by two of the main characters, Jack and Ralph. Although they both have a role as some type of leader, they are not the same and have very different leadership views and styles. Ralph wants to do everything he can so that they can survive on the island, but Jack goes crazy and becomes a savage with a thirst for blood. In the book, Ralph is not known to be

Leadership and Denial in Lord of the Flies by William Golding

882 words - 4 pages surroundings to abruptly fall into pieces. Which lead to a mass destruction of the island, Lord of the Flies. The devastating events on this island lead to the massive chaos of Lord of the Flies, blaming Ralph and Jack for denial, lack of cooperation and inefficient leadership. For instance, the denial from Ralph and Jack leads the boys to make decisions that caused havoc to their society on this island. As they; Ralph, Jack and the boys engrossed

The Conch in William Golding's Lord of the Flies

2556 words - 10 pages The Conch in William Golding's Lord of the Flies In William Golding's novel “Lord of the Flies” he uses a lot of symbolism. The entire book is microcosm to the real world, as the novel is set at the time when World War II was going on and on the island there is a hunt at the end of the book symbolic of the war. A symbol Golding uses throughout the book is the conch. It represents authority and order. The person

Similar Essays

William Golding’s The Lord Of The Flies

1345 words - 5 pages When William Golding’s The Lord of the Flies is mentioned in casual conversation, one rarely finds someone that hasn’t read it, but this was not always the case. At what point did Golding’s allegorical masterpiece get recognized? In the 1950s, Golding had just finished his book, calling it Strangers from Within. The book’s influences range from the horrendous children from his teaching years to himself and his nearly pedophilic instincts (Dirda

Symbolism In William Golding’s Lord Of The Flies

1591 words - 6 pages Symbolism is a literary device used by authors to give deeper levels of meaning to objects and better demonstrate the theme. Lord of the Flies, by William Golding, is a popular novel considered to be a “classic” by many. Golding’s literary work is contains many examples of symbolism to help readers better understand the novel’s themes. Three such cases are the conch shell, the fire, and the sow’s head that was put on a stake. Through closer

Humanity’s Evil Inspired William Golding’s "Lord Of The Flies"

1630 words - 7 pages newspapers full of stories showing humanity’s evil suggests that there is something wrong with today’s world, but newspapers have always been full of such articles and events. It is clear that humanity’s evil inspired William Golding’s Lord of the Flies: a commentary on the innate evil in all man. In Golding’s novel, a group of young boys survive a plane crash and become marooned on an empty island. Their attempt at civilization quickly fails, and leads

Madness In Elie Wiesel’s Night, And William Golding’s Lord Of The Flies

2374 words - 9 pages Mankind has struggled throughout eternity, battling the demons that come from the very depths of the soul. Elie Wiesel’s novel, Night, and William Golding’s novel, Lord of the Flies show how quickly humans can descend into chaos and savagery. When dehumanization presents itself in unruly civilizations, humans turn into more primitive beings. The process of dehumanization begins through a loss of morals, knowledge, and innocence