"Rape Of Lock" By Alexander Pope & "The Eve Of St. Agnes" By John Keats

1279 words - 5 pages

The differences between eighteenth-century literature and romantic poems, with respect to history is constituted here. This is seen through the influential works of John Keats and Alexander Pope. These works are acknowledged as, 'The Rape of Lock' and 'The Eve of St. Agnes.' Alexander Pope takes his readers on a hatred filled epic. A robust piece of literature and love induced psychoses in, 'The Rape of Lock.' On the other hand, 'The Eve of St. Agnes' told a tale of life, love, death, and eternal fate in heaven. These two brilliant writers have given two magnificent poems. Pope exhibits many characteristics of a narcissistic human being. His independence in life shows through his writings in fiction. Which inevitably portray his deeper feelings of life. Popes' efforts here are of outstanding quality. However, his poem did fail to convince Arabella to résumé her engagement to Lord Petre. Most of Pope's efforts here were written with time. Now, Keats has romantically serenaded his reader with descriptive lust and desire, which can be compared with popes' efforts by the difference in eighteenth century literature and romantic poems, their descriptive natures and ideas they portray to the reader through their writing.Pope has written an eighteenth-century poem which he calls, 'An Hero-Comical Poem.' This poem has exalted an over all sense of worthlessness for common rules. The mentioning of Achilles and the ever-popular Aeneas, are symbols of Pope's Gothic style. Pope speaks (almost) G-D like throughout, 'The Rape of Lock.' Contrary to Keats, who is more down-to-earth with his sense of realism in his writings. In the beginning of Keats romantic premise to life in St. Agnes, all is cold. The opening sequence brings a sense of realism to this bitter cold scene. Cold owls, rabbit's, and numb fingers on a holy, 'Beads man.' The Beads man symbolizes the sense of age and spirit. Much of this poem is a test of Keats inner soul or spirit. He has lead himself to St. Agnes for his own personal account of life in a time long gone. Keats' romantic style has brought visionary raw emotion to the aching hearts of all his readers. Then, both poems go separate ways in their tales of body and spirit.Taking account of all differences in these two works, has brought out a sense of unknown extasy. Pope displays morality with his own twists on fate and man kind's inability to rationalize right decision making in life. He complicates this with, 'Moral superiority' and his visions of old styles blended with his attitude for recognition. Pope has indulged the reader in consistent religious order, and awkward justice for mankind. However, when viewing Keats poem stanza by stanza, much is revealed. Keats' tale starts as a direct eagerness for future considerations. His image of love and old age creates a stifled knot in the stomach of the reader. Enthusiastic resistance is overcome by Keats smooth flow, and harmonizing beauty in heaven. Angels and death are...

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