Rate Of Respiration In Yeast Essay

2513 words - 10 pages

Rate of Respiration in Yeast

Aim: I am going to investigate the rate of respiration of yeast cells
in the presence of two different sugar solutions: glucose, sucrose. I
will examine the two solutions seeing which one makes the yeast
respire faster. I will be able to tell which sugar solution is faster
at making the yeast respire by counting the number of bubbles passed
through 20cm of water after the yeast and glucose solutions have been
mixed.

Prediction: I predict that the glucose solution will provide the yeast
with a better medium by which it will produce a faster rate of
respiration. This is because glucose is the simplest type of
carbohydrate (monosaccharide). However sucrose is a complex sugar it
contains large molecules making it a disaccharide.

Due to the large molecules being saturated and the small molecules
being unsaturated this will allow the glucose to mix easily with the
yeast therefore making it respire more frequently. The sucrose sugar
however having larger molecules will find it harder to mix in with the
yeast; this will make the rate of respiration in the sucrose much
slower as it is not as efficient as the glucose.

Yeast requires enzymes to digest the food on which the yeast is
living. The enzymes digest the food the yeast is living on (normally
sugars such as Glucose and Sucrose) breaking down the large molecules
into smaller ones. It takes longer to break down the large molecules
rather than the smaller molecules. This means that the yeast does not
need to do any work when provided with small molecule foods such as
glucose. The small molecule foods allow the yeast to respire easily.

By already having a small molecule sugar in this experiment it makes
sense that the small molecule food will use less energy from the yeast
therefore allowing it to respire more efficiently. Whereas the large
molecule food (Sucrose) will take longer to break down because of its
large molecules, this will waste the energy of the yeast as it has to
break down the large molecules into smaller molecules before it can
use them.

This means that the sucrose is not as efficient as the glucose at
providing the yeast with a better medium by which it will produce a
faster rate of respiration.

Theory: Yeast is a single celled fungus. It feeds saprophytically
(secreting enzymes from cells) the enzymes digest the food on which
the yeast is living. The enzymes digest the food the yeast is living
on (normally sugars such as Glucose and Sucrose) breaking down the
large molecules into smaller ones. It takes longer to break down the
large molecules making them less efficient than the smaller molecules.
This means that the yeast does not need to do any work when provided
with small molecule foods such as glucose. The small molecule foods
allow the yeast to respire easily.

...

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