Reasoning Essay

1040 words - 5 pages

1) Aquinas does not require that each individual person have good reasons for what he or she believes. He explains that there is the human reason (God is triune) and natural reason (God exists) which considers some truth of God. He discusses limitations to human intellect. He explains that the truth is open to reasoning. He reasons that humans have better knowledge of God when they cannot understand. He explains that many people are not fitted to reach the highest level of knowledge, which is understanding God. When truths are explained they are mixed in with false statements. Aquinas reasoning does make sense, it is vague and confusing to grasp, but the underlying components are logical. It is a good reason, because he allows for the individual to decide what he or she wants to believe and believes as their own.
2) According to Aquinas there are certain “truths of faith” that we should accept even though we are unable, by human reason, to see that they are true. He states that the divine Wisdom knows everything, and it is designed to reveal to people its teachings. He explains that the truths of reason cannot be opposed to the Divine truth, they cannot be thought of as false, and truths by faith are not allowed to be thought of as false. He states that, “…only the false is opposed to the true…” This reasoning was confusing to me, the statement makes sense, but just the explanation is hard to follow.
3) Fideism is taking a neutral stance about religious truth claims, putting all your commitments aside and turning towards the neutral side. Evans’ objections to fideism are whether or not neutral stance is desirable, because once someone becomes neutral will they be even able to understand religion. Evans explains how we cannot be religiously neutral, we will always take a side whether for God or against God. He goes on explaining that neutral stance is an illusion, and that humans are independent thinkers. He questions if we follow this neutrality then are we not putting our thoughts and reason above God. Evans believes that faith is a personal commitment, and fideism believes that faith is a precondition for correct religious thought. Evans thinks that if someone truly wants to discover the truth, fideism offers no such thing.
4) Neutralism says that religious matter is just presuppositionless. Neutralism explains that critical thinking will help us find the truth, to be completely unbiased; we need to adopt a neutral stance. Evans explains that human thinking is affected by various factors such as experiences, education, upbringing, and more. And how taking a complete neutral stance is not possible because of all the factors that attribute to our knowledge. He does not think that one can be rational if he or she takes a neutral stance. He goes on saying that truths need absolute certainty, and if we have a neutral stance then infinite regress is bound to be the outcome. He continues to say that foundational knowledge is just believed. His...

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