Reasons Why British Troops Were Sent Into Northern Ireland

2174 words - 9 pages

Reasons why British Troops were Sent into Northern Ireland

Why were British troops sent into Northern Ireland in 1969?

There were many reasons in why British troops were sent in. Some of
these reasons are short-term, such as the failure of partition and
civil rights. As well as short term factors there was long-term
factors, such as plantation, William of Orange. The combined
ingredients of both give reasons in why the British Army was sent in.
The causes in why British troops were sent in can be put into an order
of importance, Partition being one of the most important causes,
followed by plantation then Easter Rising. The Easter rising led
partition, this brewed troubles on both catholic and protestant side,
as neither side can forget the past, showing the failure of partition.
Both Irish Catholics and Protestants cannot forget the history as they
outline the importance of this for them. After Partition, Catholics
found that they were in the minority in the Protestant controlled
North. From 1922 Catholics were on the receiving end of discrimination
against them, increasing numbers of civil rights marches. By 1960s
tension is on both sides, violence escalated, leading to the British
Troops being sent in.

The reason in why the British got involved is due to a long-term
history as well as short term. Ireland has always been a catholic
country, but Henry 8th, Elizabeth 1 and James 1, sent Protestant
settlers to Ireland, Plantation. The settlers were mainly situated in
the North, where Catholic land was seized by the British, becoming
protestant land, making the North a more Protestant land. During the
English civil war, there was an Irish rebellion against the English
rule in Ulster, 1641, restoring Ireland under Irish rule. In 1649
Oliver Cromwell killed Irish Catholics. On both sides there was
murders, causing tensions between Catholics and Protestants. This
links to the battle of the Boyne, which Protestants remember the
Victory of William of Orange. William was a protestant, who defeated
Irish Catholics at the Battle of the Boyne. The Irish Protestants
remember this as the most important defeat over Catholics, every year
Protestants march celebrating King Billy’s victory at the Battle of
the Boyne. This builds tension between Irish Catholics and
Protestants, as it shows the difficulty to forget the history. By 1800
the Act of Union was introduced, giving Britain direct rule over
Ireland, giving an increase in Nationalism, hatred of British,
Protestants (loyal to the British crown). This links to the Famine
with the hatred of the British. In Ireland potato was the major crop.
In 1845 the crop failed, and as most Catholics were tenant farmers
they were faced with a choice. Catholic farmers could either eat their
crop and lose income and be evicted, or sell pay rent and...

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