Recovery In Rwanda Essay

994 words - 4 pages

"There is a saying in Rwanda that Rwandans must swallow their tears. They do. If they did not, they would surely drown."
- (Palmer, 1995, p. 459)

Recovery is a traumatic, long term process for anyone involved in genocide. Rwanda had been through so much in a short period of time. During the recovery process there were many trials and tribulations. There were many parts of recovery needed in order for the people of Rwanda to go back to living a somewhat normal life. Some key types of recovery needed were economical, political, social, mental, and demographical. Recovery was not easy for the Tutsi people of Rwanda.
Paul Kagame became president in Rwanda in 2000; with the help of ...view middle of the document...

“Where’s the benefit in a thriving new market in town if you can’t go there because you no longer trust anyone - or because the banana seller is the man who murdered your husband?" The events that lead up to this genocide left the people of Rwanda traumatized. After building a society in Rwanda that had failed, the Rwandans looked to find a new government that would benefit everyone. It is said that history repeats itself (Source #1). The Tutsi people never want to go through genocide again. Therefore, they are always telling the stories of what happened to their people hoping that it could change the future and prevent the possibility of more genocide. They wanted the policy of, “One people, one country, open to all Rwandans regardless of ethnic identity.” The people of Rwanda are consistently forced to think about the answers to what it means to be African and also, what it means to be Rwandan (Source #2). Socially, Rwanda is having a hard time dealing with genocide.
It isn’t surprising that genocide takes a gigantic toll on the minds of everyone involved. The people that were left in Rwanda after this terrible event had become widowers, orphans, and many parents lost their children. The Tutsi people had violated multiple human rights. One right that was violated was Article 5. “No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment of punishment” (Source#4). By the time the government had been recovered the biggest issues that needed attention were mental. “What use are new pots and pans if you spend your days wondering what happened to the bodies of your murdered children?” One hard-headed journalist who escaped from Rwanda said: “It’s in the soul, man. Spiritual damage is what it is” (Source #1). Recovering mentally can be extremely challenging.
For genocide that only lasted 100 days, over...

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