This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Reform Immigration Laws In The United States

1436 words - 6 pages

Current status of immigration in this country is totally out of control. Current immigration laws are not being enforced properly, borders are not fully protected and as a result the quality of life has negatively impacted the United States. In the 1980’s, there were 9,000 illegal immigrants that were imprisoned in the federal and state prisons, which currently is overloaded. Today, 352,000 are in prison under overcrowding conditions. Of these hundreds of thousands of immigrants that have been imprisoned, 27,000 have committed repeated crimes. According to discoverthenetworks.org, “In Los Angeles, 95% of homicide warrants are issued for illegal immigrants. In addition, California, 60% of Hispanic gangs are composed up of illegal immigrants”(p.1). In Nevada, 80% inflow of drugs come from Mexico. Most of the drugs were trafficked by illegal aliens. As a result, the enforcement oversight of illegal immigrants costs the tax-payers in excess of $1.6 billion per year. However, all of these immigration issues could be prevented if the Congress of the United States can reform immigration. Although increasing the government budget is my biggest concern, there are other arguments that point to this mandatory solution as well. History of immigration is an important factor that can guide the future for an effective legislation.
Successive waves of U.S. immigration were derived by the colonial society from all corners of the globe. Major waves of immigration occurred from 1830-1880 who were Northwestern Europeans and also 1880-1920, which was Eastern and Southern Europeans(Sue Lecture). Over years, public and political attitudes towards this have been emotionally mixed, paradoxical and to a greater extent, it has downright been hostile. Early immigrants that arrived from Europe came in search of economic prosperity, political freedom, yet they often depended upon the African slave labor and land they confiscated from the native Indians. The descendants of the first European immigrants were viewed as highly racial and religious(Sue Lecture). The descendants of these immigrants, in essence, have taken a negative view of the growing population of Asians, African and Latin American immigrants who have began to arrive into the U.S. in the second half of the 20th century.
First, our government spends billions of dollars per year on illegal immigrants that use up Medicaid and Medical treatment. According to Karoun Demirjian of the Las Vegas Sun, “both the Democrats and Republicans are waging a political ideology war of words instead of developing a comprehensive immigration reform policy that will enhance the economic, fiscal and demographic effects”(p.1). The current Republican party does not support any form of amnesty to illegal immigrants because it only leads more law breaking in the process. On the other hand, the Democrats fought for a Dream Act that basically guarantees young people that want to contribute fully to the society and serve our country...

Find Another Essay On Reform Immigration Laws in the United States

IMMIGRATION IN THE UNITED STATES Essay

2115 words - 8 pages Immigration has been a very serious problem within the United States for many years. I personally feel that it is hurting our economy because of the drain of open jobs available to our own citizens. Immigration is a very controversial issue not only at home, but also amongst the entire world today. The majority of this "movement" is taking place within the U.S. It has caused a dramatic increase in population. Because of the increase, crime rates

Immigration in the United States Essay

1104 words - 4 pages of immigrants, immigration contributed to half of this population growth. These immigrants, consisting of mostly Asian and Hispanic backgrounds, have drastically changed the composition of the U.S. population. In 2010, Asians and Hispanics made up 20 percent of the U.S. population, in contrast to a 6 percent share of Asians and Hispanics in 1970. It is predicted that by 2050, the share of immigrants in the United States will increase to one half

Immigration in the United States

1338 words - 5 pages Latinos and Asians also came to America as immigrants. Immigration has helped the United States by giving a helping hand and providing a workforce to deal with America’s growing manufacturing economy. In 1880-1930 more than 27 million new immigrants came to America from Italy, Germany, Europe, Russia, England, Canada, Ireland, and Sweden. Apart from all these countries, Mexico is the largest immigration source country. Chinese and Indian immigrants

Health Care Reform in the United States

1937 words - 8 pages . It is almost hard to conceive that one document can be perceived in such a wide variety of ways. This pending reform is important to every United States Citizen. As the debate climaxes over the next few months, words will be put into votes. It’s clear that everyone has an opinion about how health care reform should or should not work, but the real question is who will be the loudest in the end. The main aspect pertaining to the 18-28

Healthcare Reform in the United States

2909 words - 12 pages For decades, one of the many externalities that the government is trying to solve is the rising costs of healthcare. "Rising healthcare costs have hurt American competitiveness, forced too many families into bankruptcy to get their families the care they need, and driven up our nation's long-term deficit" ("Deficit-Reducing Healthcare Reform," 2014). The United States national government plays a major role in organizing, overseeing, financing

Health Care Reform in the United States

1021 words - 4 pages Health Care Reform in the United States In the United States, more than forty million people are without health insurance. Of these people, many are employed by firms that do not offer coverage and many others fall just below the poverty line. Many are poor but still do not qualify for Medicaid. At least twelve million of those without health insurance are children. Reliable sources indicate that the number of uninsured people could

Health Care Reform in the United States

1214 words - 5 pages hospital would not be paid for treating the patient. The case of this stillborn baby is only one of the countless examples of the injustice happening in the United States every day. There are approximately 250 million people currently living in the United States and almost 75 millions are uninsured (Botterweck 396). This includes not only the poor and minorities but also a growing number of low-paid middle class Americans who, with their salaries

Welfare Reform in the United States

2782 words - 11 pages "The U.S. Congress kicked off welfare reform nationwide last October with the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, heralding a new era in which welfare recipients are required to look for work as a condition of benefits." Originally, the welfare system was created to help poor men, women, and children who are in need of financial and medical assistance. Over the years, welfare has become a way of life for

History of Immigration in the United States

1958 words - 8 pages immigrants. Illegal immigrants have been and has continued to outnumber the number of legal immigrants, which has been going on since the 1990’s. It’s partially because of this that US lawmakers have recently made an even bigger attempt at enforcing immigration laws. Here are important dates in United States immigration. The first US immigration law was the Naturalization Act of 1790. The Naturalization Act specified that “any alien, being a

Illegal Immigration in the United States

1143 words - 5 pages Illegal Immigration The people of the United States are now showing higher dissatisfaction rates with the present US government, than that which was ever shown in the past; of course, they have very good reason to feel this way. One such example where the blatant incompetence and callous attitude of Congress

Pro Immigration in the United States

1332 words - 5 pages their constitutionality in their Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions 1798. (Yanak). Most people think that Immigrants take too much from the government that they are not respecting the U.S., however Immigrants aren't flocking to the United States to mooch off the government. According to studies, the 1996 welfare reform effort dramatically reduced the use of welfare by undocumented immigrant households, exactly as intended. And another important

Similar Essays

A Case For Immigration Reform In The United States

1773 words - 8 pages purpose is to keep to maintain the United States of America by producing policies globally competitive. It also deals with the comprehensive levels of immigration that occur in the United States of America and also, the education department among the members of the United States of America. The organization, therefore, mainly focuses on improving the future of the American citizens. This is because the organization has taken note of the gradual

Comprehensive Immigration Reform Is Necessary In The United States

1014 words - 4 pages thought of that being me or one of you. So in recognizing the immediate need of a wise and comprehensive plan to combat the growing number of illegal immigrants entering the nation through the southern border, it is imperative that the United States implement a comprehensive plan for Immigration reform. My fellow American youth I come to you today with hopes of raising your awareness on the major issue of national security because our government is

Reform In The United States Essay

921 words - 4 pages The Progressive and New Deal Eras are two of the most important and defining periods in American history. Through initiatives and reform passed during these times, America was changed politically, socially and economically. These changes affected all Americans in some way or another, but had significant impact on specific groups of American citizens. Whatever their impact, these eras jumpstarted and continued reform initiatives for our country

Immigration In The United States Essay

1983 words - 8 pages point time and again” (President Barack Obama, May 28, 2013). So far, the immigration laws we have now are not doing anything to the amount of illegal immigrants we have. Immigration does not just occur in two or three countries around the world. People from almost every country immigrate to the United States. The approximate amount of immigrants that immigrated to the United States in 2012 is 1,031,631. This number has been increasing since the