Reinventing Oneself In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

886 words - 4 pages

The art of reinventing oneself is constantly seen throughout pop culture. We see it in the reinvention of Miley Cyrus straying away from the wholesome good girl image to a provocative trashy controversial girl. Hollywood and celebrities are constantly reinventing themselves; sometimes it is for the better like wanting to clean up their image after some horrible incident. On the other hand it could be going away from the persona they are seen as, and wanting to be seen as somebody entirely different. In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s superb novel The Great Gatsby, Jay Gatsby the main character is so fixated on reinventing himself. Going to great lengths to not only reinvent himself ...view middle of the document...

Everything about Gatsby’s life revolved around his obsession with Daisy. The desire to acquire money to throw lavish parties was Gatsby’s motivation that one day Daisy would somehow stumble upon his house and find him. When they were younger Gatsby and Daisy had plans about living a life together. When Gatsby went off to war, Daisy fell into a depression; she mingled here and there, and couldn’t wait any longer. Suddenly Tom Buchanan came into her life, and they got married. Five years later Gatsby and Daisy find each other again, and Gatsby hopes to restore the relationship that he once had with Daisy. His determination is spoken well when he says, “I’m going to fix everything just the way it was before” (110). His tenacious mind set did not fix anything at the end, it only made things worse.
The life of a rich person can be very careless. They have so much money that they don’t know how to spend it. We see the carelessness of celebrities when they go bankrupt, buy gold toilet seats or crash their cars and not care at all, because they have masses amount of money to buy a new one. The 1920’s was a time of festivity. The war had ended and many were celebrating. The idea of recklessness is seen in The Great Gatsby film when Jordan is driving her car. She’s driving in an audacious way. Almost as if her driving is an indication that people need to make room for her, simply because she’s better than them. After the incident that happened...

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