Relates To "To Kill A Mockingbird," By Harper Lee. Discusses The Theme Of "Racism In The First Half Of The 20th Century"

897 words - 4 pages

The turn of the century could be described as a higher point in Afro-American history, but in no way the lesser of two evils. After Lincoln's 1862 Emancipation Proclamation (and more so the 13th Amendment to the Constitution,) slavery was abolished. But moving on to the 20th century, segregation and racism still ran rapid in America. After seeing the end of the tunnel, African-Americans again they were pushed down into second-class status. Entering into one of the most progressive centuries in history, it appeared that democracy was for whites only. Actually, the increasing growth of racism, and of segregation as well, led inevitably to the development of opposition groups bent on destroying this discrimination. But there was still a long way to go.Considering the former, the twentieth century did indeed start off slow, and was filled with hits-and-misses. In 1901, the last African-American congressman, George H. White, gave up his seat on March 4th. No African-American would serve in Congress for the next 28 years. In 1910, segregated neighborhoods were first enforced. On December 19 of that year, the City Council of Baltimore approved the first city ordinance designating the boundaries of black and white neighborhoods. This ordinance was followed by similar ones in Dallas, Texas, Greensboro, North Carolina, Louisville, Kentucky, Norfolk, Virginia, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Richmond, Virginia, Roanoke, Virginia, and St. Louis, Missouri. Case in point: Hit - The Supreme Court later declared the Louisville ordinance to be unconstitutional in 1917. Miss - 1 down, 7 to go. To top that off, federal segregation was being established. On April 11, 1913, the Wilson administration began government-wide segregation of work places, rest rooms and restaurants. This was nothing but poking the bear for a new generation.Even though slavery was abolished, the epicentre of the problem remained down in the Southern United States (and I'm not referring to the ending of Easy Rider.) The flawed paradigm of black inferiority remained. Writing on the history of slavery in the first half of the twentieth century asserted that blacks were inferior to whites, that races should be separated, and that therefore slavery was not so bad after all. This perspective was even presented in religion (showed even in the novel,) which dominated the interpretation of southern history for the next thirty years. Southerners, even until the 50's, envisioned a plantation system in which slaves were generally content with their lot and unlikely to resist. Those rare occasions in which resistance did occur were more likely the result of slaves having lazy or criminal characters rather than any legitimate complaint about their conditions. Indeed, they saw slavery as a system...

Find Another Essay On Relates to "To Kill a Mockingbird," by Harper Lee. Discusses the theme of "Racism in the First Half of the 20th Century"

The Title of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

1591 words - 6 pages The Title of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee In the novel 'to kill a mockingbird' Harper lee uses a metaphorical mockingbird to symbolise the different characters and actions within her book and to symbolise why people get the treatment they do and how they don't deserve it. The reader begins to understand the meaning of the title of the book through the personified mockingbird being used numerous times throughout

The Mockingbirds of To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

610 words - 2 pages a very nice man, just at the wrong spot at the wrong time, and is just an easy target in an all-racist-town. Just because Tom Robinson is black, he is looked down upon as bad person but that is not true. Out of all the characters in the novel to Kill A Mockingbird, the main mockingbirds were Boo Radley, Mrs. Dubose, and Tom Robinson. All of these characters are really good hearted people. They are all just misunderstood and corrupted by the talk of society. Tom is African American, Boo Radley is a mysterious man who is not as religious as Maycomb wants him to be, and Mrs. Dubose is looked down upon because of her addiction.

The Mockingbird Theme in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

1040 words - 4 pages This novel by Harper Lee has a seemingly curious title to a reader who looks at it in a literal way. Someone may argue that there are no mockingbirds in To Kill a Mockingbird but I beg to differ. An actual mockingbird may not play a large role in this story however the idea and connotation of a mockingbird becomes evident throughout the story in many characters. This is a major theme in the story and is shown through the characters Boo Radley

Theme Analysis of To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee

754 words - 4 pages To Kill A Mockingbird is a story about injustice, racism, and the co-existance of good and evil. These aspects are the result of plot development. In her novel , To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee uses setting to contribute to the development of the plot. Harper Lee illustrates Maycomb, Alabama as an old and prejudiced town. In the exposition, Scout Finch introduces Maycomb as town where nothing exciting happens, but throughout the novel we see

The Mockingbirds in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

2683 words - 11 pages Walt Whitman’s 1859 poem “Out of the Cradle Rocking Endlessly” depicts the mockingbird as a symbol of innocence that chants or sings of fond memories from the past. By contrast, Harper Lee’s famous novel To Kill a Mockingbird, published in 1960, written almost a century after Whitman’s poem, portrays the mockingbird as innocent but as a fragile creature with horrific memories – memories of discrimination, isolation, and violence. Harper Lee

Racism in the novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

753 words - 4 pages Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, affects the events in the novel by costing Tom Robinson his freedom and eventually, his life. It all starts on a normal work day of Tom Robinson’s life. He is walking home along the side of the road and as he passes the Ewell’s home, Miss Mayella Ewell decides to call Tom up to the house to ask him to help with something. After Tom helps her, Mayella reveals why she actually called him to the house. Mayella does this by

The Themes in "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee

1116 words - 4 pages The novel To Kill a Mockingbird succeeds in portraying the lifestyle of a relaxed southern town in theearly 20th century. It shows the families, feelings, and bigotry of the time. There are three main themes in the novel,which are: justice is not blind, mob rule is not the way to solve things, and that you shouldn't fear or resentsomething that hasn't done anything to disturb life. These themes are true in the novel and are also true in

The Theme of Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird

2567 words - 10 pages : why would you kill or harm something that does not mean you harm? Ultimately the mockingbird represents a form of innocence in the novel; the word “kill” is metaphorical as the innocents are being harmed or ruined by evil throughout the novel. This sentiment applies to a few characters in the book, many of which are African American. The first, and most obvious, is Tom Robinson, who is falsely accused of raping Mayella Ewell. Tom is shot after

The Theme of Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird

1327 words - 5 pages In the book To Kill a Mockingbird, many minor themes are present such as gender and age. However, the largest and therefore major theme of the book is racism. All of the events and themes in the book had only one purpose, to support the theme of racism. One of the most important events in the book was Tom Robinson’s trial, which was unfairly judged due to the fact that the jury could not see beyond the color of Tom’s skin. The put their own

Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

1089 words - 4 pages from dialogue, questions they’ve been asked by people around. Relationship in social also causes the problems like this to happen too. White people always racism, they usually messed up with people around and rarely respect colored people. They always think white people are the definition of perfect and others don’t which is not true. We all know that white people lead this thing, but in “To Kill A Mockingbird”, Harper has shown us not only white

Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

1000 words - 4 pages Racism is evident in the book To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Throughout the story whites are constantly challenging blacks, and vice versa, because blacks want to be seen as equals and not as a lesser race. Racism has been in the United States since the beginning of time, when the whites first settled here they were racist against the Indians, they beat killed and cleared out their tribes, bust because they wanted their land. Then you

Similar Essays

Essay: The Theme Of Human Dignity In The Novel To Kill A Mockingbird By Harper Lee

1504 words - 6 pages Throughout history, people are often ranked and criticized by society. An individual's nationality, wealth and social status were closely looked over by society's eye. Thus, one's dignity would be decided based on society's opinion of them. In the novel To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, the theme of human dignity is portrayed by Scout, Calpurnia, and Atticus. This essay will analyze the theme of human dignity and describe how this novel

The Theme Of Prejudice In To Kill A Mockingbird By Harper Lee

1903 words - 8 pages To Kill A Mockingbird - Harper Lee Show how the theme of prejudice is explored through the Characters of Boo, Atticus and Scout. "Show how the theme of prejudice is explored through the Characters of Boo, Atticus and Scout." In the following essay I am going to show how the theme of prejudice is explored through the Characters of Boo, Atticus and Scout. Prejudice in the novel is directed towards groups as well as individuals. As

To Kill A Mockingbird Harper Lee The Maturity Of Scout And Jem In To Kill A Mockingbird By Harper Lee

563 words - 2 pages "It is a sin to kill a mockingbird because they do nothing but make music for us to enjoy." This was quoted from To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, a creative novelist. To Kill a Mockingbird is about a young girl named Jean-Louise Finch, her brother Jeremy Finch and many other characters. Jean- Louise is nick-named Scout and Jeremy is nick-named Jem. Their father Atticus ,who was a lawyer, had been given a case to handle and did not have any

The Evolution Of Racism: To Kill A Mockingbird By Harper Lee

1384 words - 6 pages looked sick even though it was the wrong time of year for rabies. The fear drove them to kill, not the animal, it didn't hurt a soul (Lee 95-100). I believe that in doing this Lee was trying to try a parallel between overreaction towards animals and overreaction towards different races. I will be the first to tell you that racism in America during the sixties and seventies was all one side, whites hating blacks to the point that nothing