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Relationships Between Characters In Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart

766 words - 3 pages

Chinua Achebe unfolds a variety of interesting connections between characters in the Novel Things Fall Apart. Relationships with parents, children and inner self are faced differently, however the attitude that Okonkwo gave them determined what kind of outcome he generated from these relations. Okonkwo looks at everything through his violent and manly perspective and is afraid to show his real feelings because he thinks that he may be thought out as weak and feminine this paranoid attitude lead him to self-destruction.

Okonkwo the son of the useless and unimportant father Unoka strives to become rich and successful in the Ibo, unlike his father who was simple, poor and always was in debt from all of the people around. Okonkwo tries to forget everything that his father’s life meant and creates his own principles. This father’s life ended in a very disgraceful way “ He had a bad chi…or rather to his death for he had no grave.” (18). Therefore Okonkwo takes a role of a productive, wealthy, brave and violent man (who looks successful form the side) and rejects everything emotional and feminine which was most of his fathers life “ …he wore a haggard ad mournful look except hen he was drinking or playing on his flute…”(21).
Okonkwo can be seen as a tragic hero he seems to be so “ in control” due to his violent acts, order and aggression but this is his mistake (tragic flaw) which later leads to a, once again self-destruction. It’s foreshadowing but his “inwardly” attitude and using fists instead of words “ his wives …lived in perpetual fear of his fiery temper, and so did his little children” (13). However some of his actions allow us to glance at the tender and worried individual beneath the despotic and neutral exterior layer that is protecting him form the outside.

Another father and son relationship can be seen in this Novel is the connection between Okonkwo and his older son Nwoye. He is very different form his father and in some way reminds us of Unoka who was a total opposite to Okonkwo. He is the black sheep and the scapegoat of the family, before Ikemefuna is in the house that becomes like an older brother to Nwoye and teaches him to be gentle but successfully masculine at the same time “...

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