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Religion In Jane Eyre Essay

762 words - 4 pages

Over the course of the novel, Jane has trouble finding the correct balance between her moral duties and earthly pleasures, between obligation to her spirit and attention to her body. She meets three main characters that symbolize different aspects of religion: Mr. Brocklehurst, Helen Burns, and St. John Rivers. Each person represents a part of religion that Jane eventually rejects because she forms her own ideas about her faith.

Mr. Brocklehurst shows the dangers that Charlotte Brontë saw in the nineteenth-century Evangelical development. Mr. Brocklehurst receives the talk of Evangelicalism when he claims to be cleansing his scholars of pride, however his technique for subjecting them to ...view middle of the document...

During his trip he encounters "God". This encounter changed his view of Christianity and he becomes one of the greatest Christian missionaries. He is blinded for two days and on the third day his sight is restored and he converted to Christianity. Rochester asks for forgiveness in front of Jane. (3, 497) St. John Rivers is Saint John the Divine, the writer of the Book of Revelations, the final and scariest book of the Bible. The final reading attended by Jane while she is with St. John is from the Book of Revelations. Luckily, she didn't like him. She disliked his zealous Calvinistic principles of salvation and predestination. Which is confusing because it's the opposite to John Wesley's doctrine of theology, which is what Bronte believed. The Ironic part is when St. John Rivers wants Jane to accompany him to India and help him with his missionary work amongst the "heathens who says its prayers to Brahma and kneels before the Juggernaut", the same people that Brocklehurst associates with Jane. (1, 78) The final words of the novel are from a letter written to Jane by St. John Rivers. Coincidentally these are also the last words in the bible; the final verses in the Book of Revelation.
The characters in Jane Eyre and Lowood/Whitcross are connected with a segment of...

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