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Research Paper On "A Doll's House" By Ibsen.

1069 words - 4 pages

"A Doll's House" by Ibsen is quite an interesting play if one is able to expose the various hidden characteristics of the characters in the play. The protagonist of the play, Nora, is the most interesting. Nora hides many things, not only a loan, but who she really is on the inside. Nora's husband Torvald is another character that disguises who he really is. Krogstad, an employee of Torvald, is a man who is full of deceit, he has forged many a time, and is also quite good at committing blackmail. The major characters in the play to some extent all mask their inner selves, and come to a change within them.First, there is Nora Helmer. Nora is a child she may look like a woman, and posses enough years to be a woman, but she is still at heart a child. "Her childishness creates her charm, her danger, and her destiny" (Salome 68). Nora allows her husband to treat her as though she actually is a child. Torvald commonly refers to her as his little "lark" or his "squirrel". "Is that my little lark twittering out there?" (1131) Torvald continues "Is that my squirrel rummaging around?" (1131) Nora allows this treatment, which greatly resembles how a father would talk to his daughter. Nora and Torvald do not posses an equal marriage what they really have is a father-daughter relationship. Through Nora's acceptance of this treatment, Nora hides who she really is. Nora is stronger than she lets on. Nora forged a loan with her deceased father's signature, and no mere child would have the bravery do perform such a crime. This crime took courage; she was also fueled by the love she held for her husband she would not sit idly by and allow her husband to die. As she keeps this secret, Nora takes a job to raise money to pay it back. She claims "It almost seemed to me as if I were a man!"...Strength and independence slowly unfold secretly and grope toward release." (Salome 71) When the loan is exposed to Torvald, Nora discovers her true self. Torvald also at this moment exposes his true colors, and this ultimately leads to Nora's self revelation. "To Nora, it seems that she had been reduced to a lapdog which was whipped and then restored to grace, or that she had been treated like a doll which one discards and then picks up at the dictate of whim. With terrible and blinding clarity she becomes conscious of the fact that she had been a life-long toy and that she had lost her dignity in accommodating herself to others." (Salome 76) She sees the fool that she is taken to be, and she will no longer stand for this. "Awakened and without chains, Nora stands before Helmer and declares her freedom, simply, clearly, unconstrainedly." (Salome 76) Nora leaves Torvald, because she can now see how strong she really is, and will no longer allow him to deprive her of her independence, she will no longer allow him to treat her like a naive child.Torvald greatly masks who he really is. He seems confidents and acts as though he is almost perfect....

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