Reversed Right And Wrong Of The World In The Eyes Of A Child: On Reading Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn

2054 words - 8 pages

People generally accept that it is easy to tell what is right or wrong, yet what is difficult is to follow what is right. This seems to be reasonable, but can we always tell what is right or wrong definitely, or does what we call right is undeniably right, wrong is completely wrong? The answer is apparently negative. Yet what is definite is that we are so incessantly crammed by the common senses and the stipulated orders of society that we can hardly breathe some free air into our deep heart to ponder over them. As a result, what is the real world like, what is right and wrong in it are not easy to answer by us in a plain and vivid way. The picture of these are blurred and misty before us until we see a realistic panorama of the world in the naive eyes of a child-Huckleberry Finn. Although the right and wrong in it were always ironically inverted and commonly accepted by most people at that time, through the narrative and experience of Huck we can distinguish clearly whether they are valid or not. Therefore this paper will discuss these inverted right and wrong and detect the underlying prejudice from the following aspects: education, religion, moral rules, slavery and racial discrimination.I. EducationHuck was thought to be bad educated and illiterate by people such as Widow Douglas and her sister Miss Watson. As a result, they tried to educate him in the way as of class education to let Huck memorize those stiff knowledge and rules. However, this kind of education is not proper to Huck because it is lack of motivation and initiation and contrarily Huck is a teenager full of imagination and a talent of natural skills who pursuits practicability. Though the widow, Miss Watson and many other people thought education was a perfect way to help Huck to be a gentle man, it actually cut the imaginative wings and lively nature of the teenager and jailed him in a narrow space of knowledge lack of vitality and creation.Moreover, though most people thought Huck was illiterate, actually he is extraordinary talented. His talent is from his nature, his experience in life and the wild nature which is the best teacher of human being. For example, he could handle a raft or a canoe freely in the wide river, live a easy and rich life with Jim, be sensitive to the change of nature and tell the secrets of it, and know how to make a true to life murder scene to fool his Dad and so on. His is a boy with practice skills and talent which he learns or gets with clear purposes. These skills help him to explore and research the world to survive and get the first-hand knowledge which he can use his knowledge process skill to make more.Just as K. Marx and F. Engel's view of education, that is, education is to accelerate "free development of individual's initiation", Huck was well educated by his intuition and practice though it was conflict with the traditionally accepted ideas of class environment education. From the discussion, we can discern clearly that the right and...

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