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Analysis Macbeth's Soliloquy, Act 1 Scene 7

617 words - 2 pages

Macbeth's soliloquy at the start of Act 1, Scene 7, introduces us to a side of Macbeth that has not yet been portrayed earlier in the play. Here, instead of being the courageous and valiant soldier, Macbeth reveals himself to be a man who is being slowly tempted by ambition and power, though not determined enough to take the risks in order to achieve his goal, thus resulting in the repetition of "ifs" throughout the beginning of Macbeth's soliloquy. Macbeth is also very much aware of the lack of reason for the murder of Duncan. The soliloquy effectively adds to our understanding of the internal conflict that plagues Macbeth as he struggles to determine whether or not he should kill Duncan, who is a virtuous man as well as his kinsman and king. He believes that it is against the nature of man to kill someone who is of such a status and relation to him and that it is immoral to do so, "he's here in double trust: first, as I am his kinsman and his subject, strong both against the deed" and that it would be a breech of Duncan's trust in him if he decides to go through with the murder. We see Macbeth's reluctance to murder Duncan himself as he is a guest in his own home. "…as his host, who should against his murderer shut the door, not bear the knife myself." Macbeth knows that his weakness is the desire he has to seize the crown. He knows that although he does not wish to murder Duncan but for the fulfillment of his own ambition, "I have no spur to prick the sides of my intent, but only vaulting ambition…" it is something that must happen in order for Macbeth to achieve what he wants. The audience sees the conflict within Macbeth and the horrible imaginings he has for his own downfall and his fate. He knows that he is...

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