Rhetorical Analysis Of Mark Antony In Julius Caesar By William Shakespeare

965 words - 4 pages

“Julius Caesar” by William Shakespeare is the story of the assassination of Julius Caesar. Two speeches were made after his death, one being by Mark Antony. He uses many rhetorical devices in this speech to counter the previous speech and persuade the crowd that the conspirators who killed Caesar were wrong. Rhetoric is the art of persuasion and these many devices strengthen this by making points and highlighting flaws. Antony uses many rhetorical devices, all of which are used to persuade the crowd that the conspirators are wrong and Caesar did not need to be killed.
Asyndeton is a rhetorical device which eliminates conjunctions in a list. Antony uses this to convey the idea that the list he is making is not complete. It adds drama and rhythm. He opens his speech with “Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears” (III.ii.72). Anthony is addressing the crowd as these titles. They are all friendly therefore he is trying to appeal to the crowd. He eliminates the conjunctions because there are many more friendly terms he can address them as. He wants his speech to be personal and is bringing together the social gap between the plebeians [also known as peasants] and him, a person who is higher up in the Roman society. This makes the plebeians believe that he is not talking down to them, but he is talking to them as a friend. The use of asyndeton in this instance makes Antony’s speech more personable and more appealing to the crowd.
Antony uses tautology in his speech in addition to many other rhetorical devices. Tautology is the repetition of an idea in two, nearly synonymous, words or phrases. “The evil that men do lives after them/The good is oft interred with their bones” (III.ii.74-75) is an example of this device. Antony is saying that people and their good die, but the evil they have done will live on. Caesar was a good person, that is what Antony is try to preserve. These two statements both say that. Antony uses tautology to reiterate his point, and to strengthen his argument.
Antony also uses irony, a rhetorical device that relies on the discrepancy between what is said and what is meant, in his speech. “Here, under leave of Brutus, and the rest/(For Brutus is an honorable man,/So are they all honorable men” (III.ii.80-82) is an example of this irony. Antony is not intending to call Brutus and the conspirators honorable. Instead he is stating this to follow the guidelines given to him by Brutus, by not blaming the conspirators (III.i.245). Antony continues to say Brutus is an honorable man all throughout his speech for this reason. Irony hides a point that he is trying to get across, and lets the crowd know that he thinks Brutus was wrong, without saying anything bad about the conspirators.
Antony wisely places rhetorical questions in his speech. These questions are not used to question the crowd as much as make a point. “Did this in...

Find Another Essay On Rhetorical Analysis of Mark Antony in Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare

The Power of Rhetoric in Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare

1131 words - 5 pages In William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, persuasion and rhetoric play a crucial role in a myriad of events and outcomes that occur. In Act one Cassius is trying to convince Brutus to turn against Caesar and join the conspiracy. Later, in Act three, Brutus and Antony speak at Caesar’s funeral. Brutus convinces the Roman people that what he and the conspirators did was for the good of Rome. Antony then persuades the plebeians that the conspirators

Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare. The importance of Mark Antony's soliloquy (funeral speech)

519 words - 2 pages In the play Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare, Mark Antony delivers a very strong and persuasive funeral oration in Caesar's honor. Antony himself was a trusted friend of Caesar and manipulated the conspirators of the play in thinking that he approved of their deed. With his influential tone and methods of verbal communication, Antony had his audience in an awe of disgust and hate. Mark Antony's funeral speech: A soliloquy that changed the

Brutus V. Antony: Compare the speeches made by Brutus and Antony after Caesar's death. Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare

797 words - 3 pages Brutus and Antony are both portrayed as above average orators in the play Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare, and they both use this skill to achieve there preplanned goals in there speeches. Brutus's goal was to rationalize the assassination of Caesar and to convince the people that Brutus and his fellow conspirators were actually heroes for what they did. On the other hand Antony's goal was to turn the people of Rome against the

A Tragic Hero in Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare

811 words - 3 pages "You either die a hero or live long enough to see yourself become the villain", said by Aaron Eckhart (Harvey Dent) in the movie The Dark Knight, describes perfectly the theme of William Shakespeare's play, Julius Caesar. Even more so, Harvey Dent's words show the characteristics of the tragic hero in the production, Marcus Brutus. Most would argue that his part in the assassination of Caesar would make him the antagonist, or villain, but

The Tragedy of Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare

1001 words - 4 pages The Tragedy of Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare In The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare, the story revolves around the various individuals who would vie for control of the Roman Empire. All of these individuals exhibit various attributes, values, and techniques in order to facilitate this goal, from Cassius’ intelligence, Brutus’ charm and honor, to Antony’s gift to drive a crowd. And although all three desire to

The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare

1641 words - 7 pages In today’s society, people’s wills are corrupt by the power and politics of the government. This is also evident in William Shakespeare’s play, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar. Shakespeare was born in 1564, about one hundred miles from London, in a market town called Stratford-Upon-Avon. By 1585, Shakespeare had begun his career as an actor and playwright, in London. Shakespeare joined a play company, Lord Chamberlain’s Men, in 1594. Because

The Tragedy Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare

1189 words - 5 pages The Tragedy Julius Caesar is a play written by Shakespeare in 1599 that contains betrayal, deception, and exaggeration. The story revolves around the days before and after Caesar’s death. As you keep reading you see the various sides of the characters, who is truly murdering Caesar for Rome, and who is doing it for themselves. Brutus is doing it for Rome and its citizens because he feels Caesar isn’t fit for being king. While reading, it was

Julius Caesar Essay: Mark Antony as the Genius of Julius Caesar

1300 words - 5 pages Mark Antony as the Genius of Julius Caesar Mark Antony - the guy is a genius.  He gives the most powerful and emotional speech ever conjured up by a human mind.  He gets this powerful emotion from the pain of the loss of his friend, Julius Caesar.  In Shakespeare's play about the ill-fated Roman ruler, a band of conspirators plot to kill Julius Caesar.  They succeed in doing so, and Caesar's best friend Antony is infuriated.  However, he

Character Analysis of Marcus Brutus: "The Tragedy of Julius Caesar" by William Shakespeare

766 words - 3 pages William Shakespeare's play, "The Tragedy of Julius Caesar", ismainly based on the assassination of Julius Caesar. The characterwho was in charge of the assassination was, ironically, Marcus Brutus,a servant and close friend to Julius Caesar. But what would cause aperson to kill a close friend? After examining Brutus' relationship toCaesar, his involvement in the conspiracy, and his importance to theplot, the truth can be revealed.Marcus Brutus

Brutus and Antony’s Use of Rhetoric in Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare

656 words - 3 pages William Shakespeare is most well known for his plays like the Hamlet, or Romeo and Juliet, for their effects as loving tragedies; however, Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar takes a different pace because of its historical evidence that has been developed into a tragedy. This twist has caused a fictional look into what was happening in Rome during the end of Caesar’s life and thereafter, as well as the persuasive techniques used by the Romans, like

Brutus and Antony’s Use of Ethos, Logos, and Pathos in Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare

1367 words - 5 pages Politicians and companies are constantly competing to persuade the masses to “stand for this” or “buy that”, its become a part of our everyday lives, Persuasion is a very powerful weapon even against the most stoic of people. In the Tragedy, Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare Cassius, a high class politician with bad intentions persuades Brutus, an honorable, stoic high class politician and Casca to kill Caesar for the good of Rome, however

Similar Essays

Analysis Of Cassius In Julius Caesar By William Shakespeare

1061 words - 4 pages successful against Octavia, but Cassius, who was defeated by Mark Antony, gave up because he mistakened that Brutus was dead. He ordered Antony to assassinate him. He was known as “the last of the Romans” by Brutus and buried at Thasos. Cassius has his negative aspects. He dislikes Caesar deeply; he also becomes an assassin. But he has generosity in mind that is recognized. When Caesar tells Antony that Cassius is dangerous, Antony answers

Use Of Rhetorical Appeals In Julius Caesar: Brutus Vs Antony

975 words - 4 pages In Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, Brutus and Antony attempt to persuade the audience of their position on the death of Caesar. While Brutus explains that his death was necessary, Antony claims that Caesar was not deserving of his demise. However, though Brutus does have ample credibility and taps into the emotional link with his audience to some extent, he does not convey as powerful of an argument as Antony, as he fails to provide sufficient

Comapring The Speeches Of Mark Antony And Brutus In William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar

2132 words - 9 pages Comapring the Speeches of Mark Antony and Brutus in William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar The play 'Julius Caesar' reaches a peak of tension at the point of the two speeches, and so it would seem whichever speech was enjoyed more by the crowd would make the speaker the more popular. This was in fact the case in the play. Mark Antony used better techniques of speech than Brutus and he prevailed in the end. After the

Suicide In Julius Caesar, By William Shakespeare

1095 words - 4 pages brilliant Tragedy of Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare, many characters in the play take their own lives, this throws us into the dark as to whether or not their acts of suicide are heroic or weak. As described in Julius Caesar the play, Brutus is a man driven by will and pride. Honor is also a very vibrant underlying foundation of Brutus’ character. After the suspenseful assassination of Caesar, specifically during his funeral speech