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Rhetorical Analysis Of The Declaration Of Independence

875 words - 4 pages

De Anda 1Political Document or Poetry? In The Declaration of Independence Thomas Jefferson serves as a representative for the Thirteen Colonies by stating their grievances against King George the III. He elaborates on the complaints by giving his reasons for why it is necessary that the colonies break away from Great Britain and King George's rule. He states that the king has neglected, restricted, and deprived the colonies of their rights. Jefferson is able to clearly get his message across by using a variety of rhetorical devices, which include allusions, anaphora, details, diction, imagery, and tone. He uses these literary devices effectively to help convey his message, although Jefferson's most effective rhetorical device proves to be his persuasive appeal, meaning ethos, pathos and logos. With these techniques he is able to appeal to the audience's emotions, ethics, and logic, helping Jefferson to further prove his points valid.Jefferson has a very formal and professional tone to his wording and overall approach, but he also conveys an enraged tone all at once. He is very descriptive in his writing and uses a sophisticated tone to help King George understand the seriousness of his message. He constantly displays his intelligence through the use of advanced vocabulary, which enhances his tone. He does not simply state, "the King of Great Britain is a tyrant and we want to be independent". He uses phrases like, "The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute tyranny over these States"(Jefferson 238) to show that he is angered by The King's actions, while still displaying his composure.Furthermore, Jefferson's diction is also an important aspect to the message he tries to convey. His unique style of writing allows him to add meaning to his overall message. For example, Jefferson's quote, "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal" (238), displays that distinct style of his that gives more meaning to his point. The basic meaning of the quote is that no person is more important than the next, but the way Jefferson phrases it makes people believe that it is a fact, rather than his opinion. This supports his claim to King George, that it is only fair for the colonists to be treated as fairly as the people in Great Britain.The use of imagery also proves to be a useful tool in conveying his tone and message. Jefferson's use of imagery serves as a guide to create visuals in the readers mind. Moreover, it is important because it helps give the...

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