Rise Of Fascism And Communism In Europe

764 words - 3 pages

In the 1930s the rise of fascism and communism in Europe and the expansion of the German and Italian empire and also the expansion of Japanese empire in Asia saw the United States move from a policy of isolationism to supporting traditional allies and defending democracy. The United States became directly involved in World War 2 after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour.The rise of fascism in Europe began when Germany turned to Adolf Hitler, an extremist. The Fascists, under Benito Mussolini, became powerful in the 1930s. Mussolini was able to make the country come together and wanted to gain back the territory that Germany had lost from the Treaty of Versailles. Communism had started to rise when Joseph Stalin took over the Soviet Communist Party. In July 1939, the Soviet Union, under the leadership of Stalin, signed a Non-Aggression Pact with Germany. Germany no longer had the fear of having to fight a war on two fronts. Both communism and fascism were seen as potential threats to democracy. Germany, Italy joined in an alliance with Japan. By 1941, they had expanded their empire. Germany had invaded Poland. Italy launched an invasion of Egypt, Sudan and North Africa. In the Pacific, Japan was becoming successful and extended its empire into China and French Indo-China. Not only were they threats to democracy and balance of world power but to economic interests of Britain, USA, France and Holland. By 1941 Britain were under threat.The United States involvement in World War 2 was not inevitable as initially the U.S adopted a policy of isolationism. When Franklin Roosevelt became president, he pledged that the United States would become 'the good neighbour' in world affairs. This meant that 'no state has the right to intervene in the internal or external affairs or another'. The declaration of isolationism was made to try and stop the United States becoming involved in World War 2. Pacifists and people who believed that the U.S should never become involved in any kind of war were known as 'Isolationists' and they supported isolationism. Between 1935 and 1937 the United States Government passed a series of acts known as the Neutrality Laws. These laws placed restrictions on the sale of arms to countries at...

Find Another Essay On Rise of Fascism and Communism in Europe

Comparing Fascism, Communism and Nazism Essay

714 words - 3 pages Comparing Fascism, Communism and Nazism Fascism, and discontent go hand in hand. After WWI Europe was devastated, the people had lost hope in the systems, neither the liberals, nor conservatives had been able to prevent the terrible disaster that was the war. Socialists were the closest one, however not happy with socialism either, a group of socialist joined and formed their own ideology. The difference between this new ideology, and

Compare and Contrast the rise and forms of Fascism in Germany and Italy

1003 words - 4 pages After the First World War, Europe was completely ravished, with millions dead, millions of dollars in debt, and a broken infrastructure. People in Europe often were subject to famine, disease and dissidence. In order to combat this, throughout Europe two very different idea of government were taking roots in mainland Europe, Communism and Fascism. In countries neighboring Russia, and France the ideals of Communism began to become popular

The establishment of communism in eastern europe

997 words - 4 pages The establishment of communism in Eastern EuropeIn the outcome of the Second World War, Europe was demolished, especially Germany, both the Soviet Union and the United States emerged as the embryonic superpowers. One of the superpowers, United States, concentrated on the rebuilding of Western Europe by setting up democratic governments while the Soviet Union proclaimed their authority over Eastern Europe. The development on both Western and

the establishment of communism in eastern europe

997 words - 4 pages The establishment of communism in Eastern EuropeIn the outcome of the Second World War, Europe was demolished, especially Germany, both the Soviet Union and the United States emerged as the embryonic superpowers. One of the superpowers, United States, concentrated on the rebuilding of Western Europe by setting up democratic governments while the Soviet Union proclaimed their authority over Eastern Europe. The development on both Western and

The Advantages of Communism in Eastern Europe

895 words - 4 pages The collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe had significant negative effects on crime rates, poverty levels, and civil rights issues, all of which had been kept at bay during the Communist party's rule over Easter Europe. Just as the Berlin Wall crumbled to the ground so did the hopes and dreams of the newly freed citizens of post communist Europe. Crime rates, poverty levels and civil rights violations took a turn for the worst.Shortly after

The Fall of Communism in Eastern Europe

1982 words - 8 pages The Fall of Communism in Eastern Europe Many political beliefs exist. Everyone has the right to chose what to believe in, what ideas to have, what to seek and how to achieve his goals. Political science is not very defined and strict. Specific rules saying that if one believes in a certain idea he should join a certain party do not exist. Certain things match certain group of people and other things this group of people would not accept

rise and forms of fascism in italy and germany - history european civil wars HY293 - essay

894 words - 4 pages HY 293 HANDOUT – WEEK 3 Appeal to the civilised nations Declaration signed by 93 German academics and intellectuals, 4 October 1914 In our quality as representatives of German science and art, we the undersigned solemnly protest before the civilised world against the lies and calumny with which our enemies attempt to dirty the just and good German cause in the terrible struggle which has been forced upon us, and which threatens nothing less

The Rise of Communism in Russia

1962 words - 8 pages The Rise of Communism in Russia"Unless we accept the claim that Lenin's coup d'etat gave birthto an entirely new state, and indeed to a new era in the history ofmankind, we must recognize in today's Soviet Union the old empire ofthe Russians -- the only empire that survived into the mid 1980's"(Luttwak, 1).In their Communist Manifesto of 1848, Karl Marx and FriedrichEngels applied the term communism to a final stage of socialism inwhich all

The rise of communism in Russia

2190 words - 9 pages The Rise of Communism in RussiaÒUnless we accept the claim that LeninÕs coup dÕ tat gave birthto an entirely new state, and indeed to a new era in the history ofmankind, we must recognize in todayÕs Soviet Union the old empire of theRussians -- the only empire that survived into the mid 1980ÕsÓ (Luttwak,1).In their Communist Manifesto of 1848, Karl Marx and FriedrichEngels applied the term communism to a

The Rise and Fall of Communism

1819 words - 8 pages Everyone would like to live in a perfect society, and in Germany, Karl Marx set out to do just that by creating the government system known as Communism. Though, this system has failed in many countries all over the world because of many significant flaws in the very foundation of the system. Some of the most feared probabilities in society that Communism was created to eliminate still prevailed and were at the heart of the system’s downfall. If

Causes in the Rise of Italian Fascism: 1870 to 1922

3635 words - 15 pages " social, political and economic integration, and to get the Italian people to accept and support the state, and feel a communality of purpose and interest with it," or, as Massimo D'Azeglio so eloquently put it: "We have made Italy, now we must make Italians..." (Lintner, 2001, p.172) This task was to prove so difficult for the Liberal state that it would actually fail, leaving room for the rise of Fascism in the 1920's and to it's chokehold on

Similar Essays

Europe Between The Wars: Fascism And The Nazi Rise To Power (1919 1939)

3940 words - 16 pages find his arguments compelling or flawed? Why is war such an important requirement for the fascist state? What did Mussolini mean by "[the individual] is deprived of all useless and possibly harmful freedom, but retains what is essential"? What is "harmful freedom" as opposed to "essential freedom"? In what ways was Hitler's concept of fascism (as expressed in the various documents) consistent or inconsistent with Mussolini's concept?3. Why was the

Discuss The Rise And Consolidation Of Fascism In Italy

2301 words - 9 pages committee to reform the constitution, and in October 1925, a failed assassination attempt gave Mussolini the chance to ban the Socialist party. Then in January 1926, Mussolini's rule became law when he was granted the right to issue decrees carrying the full force of the law. Parliament no longer had a say in what went on and Il Duce, had established his Dictatorship.BIBLIOGRAPHY :ITALY: LIBERALISM and FASCISM 1870 - 1945, Mark Robson, 2nd Edition, 2000.The Rise of Italian Fascism, Andrew Boxer, 2000.Italian Fascism. Its origins & development, Alexander De Grand, University of Nebraska Press, 1982.Modern Italy, Denis Mack Smi

The Rise Of Fascism In Italy

645 words - 3 pages Rise of fascism in ItalyThe end of WWII brought inflation, unemployment and talk of revolution to Italy.Peasants confiscated land they had been promised. Strikes were countered by lockout which was countered by occupying factories.Italy felt humiliated b/c of the peace treaty and the fact they didn't get Dalmatian islands and other bigger western powers treated them like doody.Gabriele d' Annunzio, Italy's most famous poet, led an expedition and

Benito Mussolini And The Rise Of Fascism

1038 words - 4 pages . Hitler and Mussolini supported each other, however as the years went by, Benito Mussolini became more and more influenced by Hitler. The rise of Benito Mussolini and his political party played a critical role in the growth of fascism as well as Italy's decision to side with Germany in World War 2.Before Benito Mussolini and his fascist regime came to power, Italy was in a horrible state. Italy had suffered badly during the First World War having