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Rise Of Parliamentary Power Essay

2022 words - 9 pages

Rise of Prime Ministerial Power

The rise of prime ministerial power has gained over time and continues to keep on growing as new opportunities present themselves. The power splurges through the use of the media, exploitation of unwritten rules, dominant rhetoric, the power of appointment and unaccountability of our prime minister. In Canada, our prime minister has power like no other when it comes to democracy and as it continues to grow the thought of to much power within one person arises. The use and misuse of all the factors of growth in power is what enables prime ministerial power to grow and flourish without hesitation.

The prime ministers power articulates from the fact that there are unwritten parts to the constitution and therefore makes it hard to determine the actual power and responsibilities the prime minister actually has. Furthermore with these unsaid rules, when there is a minority government, the government has to be more careful and follow guidelines more carefully according to the author of Democratizing the constitution, Peter Aucoin and that has “gave us a kind of false security about our knowledge of out unwritten constitutional conventions”(91). Now that we have a majority government it has been brought into question the amount of power the prime minister truly has. Since in Canada he is the head of the government it is hard to argue anything that is perceived by the public as “wrong” if there are no set of written rules within our constitution to back it up. Therefore since the duties of a prime minister are unclear in certain parts of the constitutional documents, it is hard to enforce action on what the prime minister if he decides to favor or neglect within the government. Unwritten rules consequently work in the favor of the prime minister and in tern in a great factor to the growth of the prime ministerial power.

The use of powerful language and persuasion also nearly always works in the favor of the prime minister and helps him/her maintain and grow their power. They use rhetoric to achieve policy goals and persuade the public opinion to benefit them and keep them in the spotlight (Toge 2011, p.1). By using powerful rhetoric it persuades the public to go in favor of the prime minister and it is one of his ways to successfully convey the ideas of the government through a dramatic way. It is essential for the policy aims to be completed and a huge factor in laying out there platform to the public. It helps the prime minister keep it followers and gain more along the way as long as it is intriguing to the minds of the public. Through the use of rhetoric it brings much power to the prime ministers in a way that is settle yet powerful, and keeps the public eye watching.

The media also brings much attention to the prime minister. As we see on the news, radio stations and papers the prime minister is always on spotlight either dominating his opposition or trying to bring in new laws and regulations in which...

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