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Robert Frost Home Burial A Reflection Of Reality

938 words - 4 pages

 Home Burial as a Reflection of Reality     

Robert Frost's "Home Burial" is a masterfully written work, conceived from his and his wife's anguish at the loss of their first-born son as well as from the estrangement between his sister-in-law and her husband due to the death of their child. In Donald J. Greiner's commentary on Frost's works, "The Indespensible Robert Frost," it is revealed that "Mrs. Frost could not ease her grief following Elliot's death, and Frost later reported that she knew then that the world was evil. Amy in "Home Burial" makes the same observati Often it seems that writers have their own personal inspiration that fuels a great work to cause its readers to realize the complexity of the human nature. Robert Frost's "Home Burial" is a masterfully written example of such works, conceived from his and his wife's anguish at the loss of their first-born son as well as from the estrangement between his sister-in-law and her husband due to the death of their child. In Donald J. Greiner's commentary on Frost's works, "The Indespensible Robert Frost," it is revealed that "Mrs. Frost could not ease her grief following Elliot's death, and Frost later reported that she knew then that the world was evil. Amy in "Home Burial" makes the same observation". "Home Burial" illustrates the cause of the failing marriage as a breakdown of communication, both verbally and physically, between two people who adopt totally different views in the midst of crisis.

Amy does not believe that her husband is in mourning over the death of their child. Her view can be defended by the fact that she is feeling unimaginable pain that she justly feels is unique to the nurturing nature of a mother. The child that was born from her womb is dead, and now she feels that a part of herself has died, so how can she dare to go on with her life? In opposition to Amy's view, how does she know what her husband is going through without any attempt to reach him? She refuses to believe that he sees her pain, and she undermines his grief in the process, completely dismissing his personal way of coping as indifference.

Amy's husband is trying to understand her view but ultimately cannot, and finally his questions and pleas give way to impatience and frustration. She is full of accusations towards him and almost seems to blame him for her misery instead of seeking any kind of comfort that they might share. The marriage is failing not only because they have lost their ability to talk normally to eachother, but also because the physical side of their marriage is absent. Touch is a form of communication that the total absence of alone can destroy a loving union. Frost leaves the...

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