Robinson Crusoe, By Daniel Defoe Essay

840 words - 3 pages

Robinson Crusoe
This book report is on the story Robinson Crusoe. The book was written by Daniel Defoe. The genre of the story is adventure fiction. The book has a total of 266 pages.
Robinson Crusoe, the main protagonist in the story, was born in 1632 in the city of York. He was the third son of a German merchant, and was taught very early in his life to be a man of law. Despite this, all that Robinson wanted to do was go to sea. Robinson decides to embark on a ship with his friend to London, but during the sailing a huge storm comes in and nearly kills everyone on board. After this, Crusoe's friend decides to stop traveling by sea, but Robinson is persistent on sailing and decides to go on another ship to London which ends up being better, and leaves his money with a kind widow to go on another trip. The ship he goes on is captured by pirates and Crusoe is then enslaved in a North African town named Sallee. After years of imprisonment, Robinson manages to escape on a fishing boat with a little slave boy named Xury. After escaping pursuers, Robinson and Xury sail down the African coast until running into a friendly Portuguese captain. He buys pelts that Crusoe got while exploring the coast, and also buys Xury from him too, and takes Crusoe to Brazil. Now in Brazil, Robinson buys a plot of land and becomes a plantation owner. He becomes very successful, but heads to Africa for a slave gathering expedition, and gets ship wrecked before even leaving the Caribbean. Robinson Crusoe finds himself on an empty island with no other human being.
Being the only person who survived the crash, Crusoe makes a shelter and a small raft, which he uses to go to the crashed ship to find items not ruined by the water. He finds guns, powder, food, and other assorted things, and also finds a dog and two cats still alive on the ship and takes them to his home. He makes a cross where he writes the date in which he got stranded, September 1st, 1659, and makes a notch every day to keep track of the time, along with a journal. Crusoe starts making things like furniture, a cellar for his home, and starts planting grains. After surviving an illness, Robinson becomes very religious. After surveying the island, Crusoe gets a pet parrot and a goat, and starts getting skills in bread making, basket weaving, and made two canoes. Robinson starts felling...

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