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Roman Catholic Church Reformation: Martin Luther

853 words - 4 pages

On the 31st of October 1517 was the beginning of the reformation when Martin Luther Posted up his Ninety-Five Theses on the door of the Roman Catholic Church and published in Wittenberg, Germany. The Reformation Became the Basis for the founding of Protestantism, one of the three major branches of Christianity. Luther had far-reaching political, economic and social effects. But the main question is why Martin Luther was able to successfully challenge the church of its religious and political authority? After evaluating the main reasons why Luther had success challenging the church, it is to all appearances that the circumstances were in his favour and available to him during that time. To ...view middle of the document...

The printing press was one of the most important reasons why Luther was able to successfully challenge the church. In January 1518, a year after Luther Nailed up his Ninety-five theses, Christoph Von Scheurl and other friends translated the theses into German, the language most people spoke, since it was originally Witten in Latin. The Printing Press Printed and copied it, making it one of the first documents to be done with it. Within two week, copies spread throughout Germany and within two months, copies spread all through Europe. The print press made it able to get the churches wrong doings out to the people of Europe following the churches rules and translating the theses into German for people that were uneducated or illiterate to understand Latin. The printing press increased the notoriety of Martin and made many other people across Europe protest the ecclesiastical structure of catholic religion. With the printing press spreading throughout Europe, the church wasn’t able to keep the new quite like they did with others who attempted to rebel against them. For example Jan Hus who was executed for heresy against the doctrines of the Catholic Church. As much as they wanted to burn Martin Luther to the stake the word was out and unable to be stopped.
Later on, the council released the edict of worm, banning Luther’s writings and declaring him a “convicted Heretic”. This made Luther a condemned and wanted man. Local Duke Frederick of...

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