Romeo And Juliet The Balcony Scene

1176 words - 5 pages

Act II, scene ii of Romeo and Juliet is commonly known as the "balcony scene," and although this designation may be inaccurate (Shakespeare's stage directions call for Juliet to appear at a "window," not on a balcony), this scene has been quoted from, played, and misplayed more than any other in all of the Bard's works. It is proceeded by some astoundingly beautiful verse in Mercutio's "Queen Mab" speech of Act I, scene iv., and by the individual and joint speeches of Romeo and Juliet at the banquet which concludes the first act and includes a wonderful exchange in which the lovers author a sonnet together. But the balcony scene rises even above these brilliant flashes and is indelibly etched in our memories. Here Shakespeare's genius is evident even at a relatively early stage in his career, and while the characters of Romeo and Juliet predominate, the playwright employs certain key dramatic devices and stage techniques that amplify the scene's impression.There is, to begin, a deliberate heightening of dramatic suspense immediately before Romeo enters into Juliet's orchard. Before the beginning of Act II proper, Shakespeare inserts a second appearance by the Chorus (II, chorus 2, ll.1-14). Taking the same sonnet form as the play's Prologue, this speech is meant to heighten the narrative tension, suggesting, that Romeo, "being held a foe," may not have access to his Juliet. The dissonance is intensified still further when a lone Romeo asks aloud "Can I go forward when my heart is here?" (II, I, l.1). When Mercutio and Benvolio enter just as Romeo withdraws, there is a mild sense of pursuit that lends even greater urgency to the moment. But the search for Romeo is broken off, with Romeo then emerging in Act II, scene ii to mark a line between the outside world and the lovers' world at hand by having the last word in the discourse of his friends, He jests at scars that never felt a wound" (II, ii, l.1).The second line of the balcony scene stands in sharp relief to the first. Romeo "But soft, what light through yonder window breaks?" (l.2), Romeo proclaims and not only does the level of diction now rise to the formally poetic, unlike the first line, Romeo is not simply inserting his own wit but describing to the audience the impression that Juliet makes upon him. Romeo now becomes a guide to the spectator. He sees Juliet in profile and remarks, "She speaks but she says nothing, what of that?" (l.12). The questioned asked is addressed to both Romeo himself and to us, the sympathetic spectator, so that we share directly in Romeo's joy to find "She speaks!" (l.25). Unaware of Romeo's presence below, Juliet utters the famous lines: "O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?/Deny thy father and refuse they name/Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love/And I'll no longer be a Capulet." (ll.33-36). Romeo addresses an anonymous (but sympathetic) spectator, Juliet addresses a known (but absent) Romeo. When he continues his role as a guide, saying in a...

Find Another Essay On Romeo and Juliet - The balcony Scene

Comparative Essay on the use of media two directors make of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, with paricular reference to Act I Scene I: The fight Scene and Act II Scene II: The Balcony scene

1993 words - 8 pages Compare and contrast the distinctive use of media two directors make of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet with particular reference to Act I Scene I: The Fight Scene and Act II Scene II: The Balcony SceneIn this piece of coursework I will be looking at the different interpretations of two directors on Romeo and Juliet. The interpretations of Franco Zeffirelli and Baz Lurhamn are very different and contrasting. Nearly 30 years apart we can see that

Balcony Scnece in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

1807 words - 7 pages Balcony Scnece in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet The balcony scene in and Romeo and Juliet is the most iconic and recognised scene, because it represents young love, and symbolises the power of youth, as Romeo and Juliet try to put right the mistakes of their elders. The scene shows how their love over comes their difficulties. Romeo wooing Juliet at the balcony is a ideal romantic situation, as it is still

Romeo and Juliet- the significance of Act 1 Scene 5

3026 words - 12 pages Romeo & Juliet: Act 1 Scene 5 Romeo & Juliet: Act 1 Scene 5 Analyse the dramatic effectiveness of Act 1 Scene 5 of Romeo & Juliet, exploring how Shakespeare has created an atmosphere of romance and danger in the scene. William Shakespeare's Romeo & Juliet is a tragedy that tells the story of two `star crossed lovers'. Most of the main themes of the play are included in Act 1 Scene 5 and therefore it is

The Opening Scene to Baz Lurhman's Romeo and Juliet

732 words - 3 pages The Opening Scene to Baz Lurhman's Romeo and Juliet The play Romeo and Juliet is set in the Italian city of Verona, it is about a blood feud between two families called the Montague's and the capulet's. Two people from the Montagues and Capulets fall in love and only when they die will the fighting between the two families come to an end. The opening scene to Romeo and Juliet is set in a public place in Verona

Romeo and Juliet. The significance of Act3 Scene 1

2041 words - 8 pages Act 3 Scene 1 and Its Significance In The PlayIn 1595, William Shakespeare wrote what was to be one of the most celebrated plays of all time. 'Romeo and Juliet' is a tale of "A pair of star-crossed lovers" whose lives are entangled in a vine of fate that leads to their final breath. Both characters were born into an "ancient grudge" that had been fuelled by formidable families, the Capulets and the Montagues. Act 3 Scene 1 twists this love story

Shakespeare Module Romeo and Juliet Writing about the scene

1172 words - 5 pages Shakespeare ModuleRomeo and JulietWriting about the scene1.In the time Romeo and Juliet was written and set, the father was very much the head of the household. He was to be respected by all the family and his daughters especially would have been expected to obey his commands. In the case of Capulet and Juliet, this is quite apparent. Perhaps this is because she is an only child, or perhaps because of the type of person Capulet is.This scene is

Romeo and Juliet: Act 1 Scene 5

858 words - 3 pages Romeo and Juliet: Act 1 Scene 5 In William Shakespeare’s play Romeo and Juliet, about two love struck teenagers whom aren’t able to be together due to their families feud/ social situation. There are two key themes that of love and hate. Before Romeo and Juliet meet, the audience is only aware that he is a Montague and that she is a Capulet. This adds to the scene being so dramatically effective as do other happenings throughout the length of

Romeo and Juliet: Act III, Scene V

863 words - 3 pages MIDTERMRomeo and Juliet: Act III, Scene VAct III, Scene V of Romeo and Juliet is significant for it is the most pivotal scene of this tragic play. Although prior scenes present extreme circumstances, this scene reveals the results of past activities and begins a series of tragic misunderstandings and fatal reactions. Transformations occuring amongst characters and their relationships with one another and the tone of the play are revealed in this

"Romeo and Juliet": Act 1 Scene 5

884 words - 4 pages In William Shakespeare's play "Romeo and Juliet", about two love struck teenagers whom aren't able to be together due to their families feud/ social situation. There is two key themes that of love and hate. Before Romeo and Juliet meet, the audience is only aware that he is a Montague and that she is a Capulet. This adds to the scene being so dramatically effective as do other happenings throughout the length of the scene. These include the

Romeo and Juliet Act 3 Scene 1

781 words - 3 pages Oh, I'm fortune's fool! Banished from Verona? Not able to see my dearest Juliet? I've only been married to her for an hour! And now, I'm banished away from her, forever! How could I live without her? How could I live without my bright angel? Oh, a curse it is! Banishment is torturing me to death! How could I live without Juliet? I would rather die! Heaven is here, where Juliet lives. The prince has shown no mercy to me! How is it that every cat

The Role of Act 3 Scene 1 and Act 3 Scene 5 in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

4863 words - 19 pages The Role of Act 3 Scene 1 and Act 3 Scene 5 in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet There are several incidents that take place during the course of the play that prepare us, the audience, for the plays tragic end. Shakespeare manages to use several devices to prepare us for the plays tragic end. He uses a prologue at the beginning to give us a brief idea about the play. Devices such as omens, premonitions, soliloquies

Similar Essays

Romeo And Juliet Balcony Scene Essay

1088 words - 4 pages The Balcony scene takes place in a private, secluded garden that is surrounded by walls. These walls are symbolic as they represent the barriers between Romeo and Juliet and they are high which represents the dangers they are facing by seeing each other against their families', the Montague's and Capulet's, wishes. The Balcony scene is not only very dramatic with many occurrences of love but also has indications of fate and what might happen in

Romeo And Juliet: Analysis Of Balcony Scene

832 words - 3 pages the greeting to the departure and each part was found deeply embedded in (II.ii). For example, In the Romeo's greeting he uses Personification and Simile to compare and compliment Juliet's beauty... Symbolism and Hyperbole were used to show how Romeo reveals his love to his dear Juliet and what she was to him. Even Metaphor and Verbal Irony to covers farewell when Juliet shows reluctance in seeing Romeo leave. Evidently, Shakespeare uses an abundant amount of figurative language and literary devices to convey Romeo's and Juliet genuine feeling for each other in the balcony scene.

Review Of The Balcony Scene In William Shakespeare's Romeo And Juliet

2919 words - 12 pages Review of the Balcony Scene in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet The balcony scene is a key part in Romeo and Juliet as it shows there love for each other for the first time. The balcony scene is after the masked ball in that Romeo and Juliet first meet and through the scene they declare their love and promise marriage. The love between Romeo and Juliet is quite sudden as they meet in one night and in that same

Analysis Of The Balcony Scene In Romeo And Juliet By William Shakespeare

1210 words - 5 pages Analysis of the Balcony Scene in Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare Love is profound and unconditional. Love is devotional and overwhelming but as for Romeo and Juliet , they are not supposed to fall in love because they are sworn enemies. When Romeo and Juliet fall in love they are aware of the risks they are taking but the feeling of love is powerful and Romeo is a romantic dreamer, they are not afraid to fall