Royal Proclamation Essay

606 words - 3 pages

Royal Proclamation of 1763: a Historic Moment

Few Canadians acknowledge the Aboriginals and their land rights, and even fewer Canadians study them. The Royal Proclamation of 1763 is considered one of the most important treaties in history to be made with the Native People; yet very few have even a vague idea when they hear the words “Royal Proclamation, 1763”. Even with the grounds that the Royal Proclamation of 1763 provided, Canada has repeatedly shown ill treatment towards Aboriginals in an repugnant manner. The Royal Proclamation should be respected as an official treaty, signified as a milestone, as well as to be a lesson to teach Canadians equality toward Aboriginals.

Respect is a quality that is almost always expect of one in all societies. Why should it be any different when it comes Canadians and Aboriginals? Known as the “Indian Magna Carta”, the Royal Proclamation of 1763 is ...view middle of the document...

Corporates, companies and anyone else attempting to open up Aboriginal for development or resource collection must respect the rights of the Natives laid out before them, and cannot simply ask them to move.

Being over 250 years old, the Royal Proclamation of 1763 still remains one of the most significant documents between settlers and Natives. This document thoroughly strengthened the ties between the two, as the Natives realized that they have gained acknowledgement and respect from the king. The developments between the two people lead to one advancement after another, and it did not take long before they were fighting alongside one another in combat. This document should mark a milestone in Canadian history as two former foes now became comrades, and the land was distributed equally amongst both settlers and Aboriginals.

Scholars have recognized through the years that the Royal Proclamation was a vital first step toward the recognition of Aboriginal property. Though having qualities to monetize the land for settler use with little compensation to the Natives, it was arguably a great deal better than being non-existent. The Royal Proclamation taught a very important lesson: treat the Aboriginals with respect and divide up the land in equivalence. With vast amounts of land dedicated especially to the Aboriginal reserve, it soon became apparent settlers had more freedom in the new world due to Aboriginal content. The lesson goes, if Canadians can learn to treat Aboriginals with respect, it would be easier to get respect and whatever else in turn.

The Aboriginals should have a first say when it comes to the future of what will happen on the land they inhabit. They have developed their way of life on that earth for thousands of years, and it is only fair they have the first priority. It is unacceptable that Aboriginals have been ignored in the past, however with more and more treaties outlining right they have, the situation has certainly improved. The Royal Proclamation was the beginning of a revolution to how Canadians viewed the First Nations.

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