Satire Of The Utopian Future: Brave New World By Aldous Huxley

1983 words - 8 pages

While the knowledge of the world around man may open door to him, it leaves his mind filled with endless thoughts that weigh on him. In Aldous Huxley’s novel Brave New World, Huxley describes a satiric version of the utopian future where humans are genetically bred and classically conditioned to live passively and happily in their subservient culture. Throughout the novel, this idea of happiness verses knowledge and intelligence is brought before the characters of Huxley’s society. The only way this perfect society flourishes is due to the fact that everyone is the same; all of them working for one common goal, all of them believing one common idea. Characters in the novel often shy away from having any sort of intellectual conversation, or simply do not have the time in between their daily rations of soma, a euphoric like drug that keeps them busy. Time and time again in Huxley’s writing he suggests one thing about knowledge and happiness: that they cannot possibly exist simultaneously within one being.
The society of Brave New World functions on the basis that everyone in the society is the same, individualism becomes a criticism not a compliment in this world. From birth, each member of the society is told that to be a part of the group is the only way to live. They never question the ideas taught in childhood because as a whole, they are either to stupid to come up with the question itself due to genetic mutations, or too drugged on soma to question the life they lead. In the beginning of the novel, one of the directors Mustapha says “the old men have no time, no leisure from pleasure, not a moment to sit down and think – or if even by some unlucky chance such a crevice of time should yawn in the solid substance of their distractions, there is soma…” (55). The society in the book forces its citizens to be constantly moving or experiencing some type of physical pleasure, which leaves them no time to think or ponder anything that may come into their minds. Any moment that is void of some type of work, is automatically filled with the physical pleasures that soma can produce for them, which leaves them happy but unable to truly think for themselves. There are intellectuals in the society, Alphas, who are allowed to have the most intelligence of the whole society, but just like all other parts of society, are kept in a constant state of suspended happiness. Since their minds are occupied with joy, the need for intellectual discussion or thoughts becomes obsolete. The need for knowledge becomes obsolete to them. Brave New World’s leaders see intellect as the enemy to their well oiled machine of a government. The Director also talks about intellect saying, “For particulars, as every one knows, make for virtue and happiness; generalities are intellectual necessary evil” (4). Much of the power the World State has over its citizens has to do with intellectual control. The Director's inclination that people should know only a little about the...

Find Another Essay On Satire of the Utopian Future: Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley

891 words - 4 pages unpredictable. By removing disease, war, famine, and the like, the world government has a greater sense of control. By promoting the three principles the Controllers have created a situation that they believe is a happy, utopian society. Works Cited Brave New World Aldous Huxley

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

1618 words - 6 pages Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Brave New World, a novel by Aldous Huxley was written at a tine in history when war had ravaged much of the nation, Depression was blanketing society, and people’s wills were being put to the test. Science had become an overwhelming force for better or for worse. People had witnessed science saving and preventing millions of lives with vaccinations and such, but on the contrary, had also witnessed it kill

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

1181 words - 5 pages Brave New World, a novel written by Aldous Huxley, can be compared and contrasted with an episode of The Twilight Zone, a fantasy, science-fiction television series, called “Number 12 Looks Just Like You.” Brave New World is a highly regarded and renowned work of literature as The Twilight Zone is considered one of the greatest television series of all time. Brave New World and The Twilight Zone’s episode “Number 12 Looks Just Like You” can be

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

871 words - 3 pages conflict either Communist or Communist-controlled, (at one instance a character refers to his friend as “Comrade”). Threats of a totalitarian communist based government were a huge concern of George Orwell. Aldous Huxley Utopia does not have a particular basis to ground it in, so therefore it is more likely than 1984 to happen in the present or near future. The society shown in Brave New World has more of an opportunity to arise in modern times

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - 760 words

760 words - 3 pages Aldous Huxley saw problems with the world, and he wrote a novel about a fictional solution. In his novel, Brave New World, people of the distant future are part of a radical new society. the planners of this utopic system of social organization seek to abolish inequalities among humans, social unrest, war, unhappiness, and the miserable human condition. Although this utopia is set hundreds of years into the future, it contains elements of our

"Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley.

1541 words - 6 pages reasons for what one believesfor other bad reasons-that's philosophy. People believe in God because they'vebeen conditioned to.Personal commentI regard Brave New World as a very interesting book. Aldous Huxley had a good idea of a future society and he expressed his idea very well. The novel is written very vividly and impressively. It is especially suitable for people who are both interested in the future, progress and technology and who also aren't

"Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley.

1988 words - 8 pages Brave New WorldSociety is made up of the morals and beliefs of man intertwined with the foggy nature of science. However, science and society do not necessarily mix. In the book, "Brave New World," by Aldous Huxley, a world without emotion and human nature is created in order to fit a perfect caste system within society. The name of this society is the World State and it is powered by engineers, scientists, and counselors that control the

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - 1397 words

1397 words - 6 pages allows these view to shine as illustrated by John’s infatuation with this new world, his dissatisfaction and isolation, and finally his eventual suicide. The World State powerful ideals are expressed through the use of significant relationship, high art, and true raw human emotion and a higher religious power. John’s wide and different character portrayal is the key to establishing the world state as a dystopia and the overarching flaws of society. Works Cited Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: Harper & Bros., 1946. Print.

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley - 1551 words

1551 words - 6 pages Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Humans have transformed their social organization, time and time again. Social separation has existed since the Neolithic Revolution. Very recently, we have begun to head down a dangerous path to what we can call a Brave New World. A “Brave New World” is one in which those in charge begin to intrude on the lives of individuals to the extent that the government has so much control that it begins to create

"Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley

1403 words - 6 pages Importance of Community Stability Identity in Brave New WorldA Brave New World by Aldous Huxley is a great example of a dystopia as he creates the “perfect world” where everyone is happy in their own place in society. Huxley tries to create an ideal society by imposing the Community Stability Identity. This seemingly intelligent invention had many elaborate steps to ensure stability. This process included genetic engineering, known as

"Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley

1123 words - 4 pages The society in "Brave New World", by Aldous Huxley, is exceptionally different from society today. Acts that are accepted in today's society are frowned upon in the society Huxley creates, such as, worshipping God, and marriage. Science and technology rule the society in Brave New World, and due to this, society is incredibly efficient and productive. One might see the society in Brave New World as improved and beneficial, but despite the

Similar Essays

"The Brave New World" By Aldous Huxley.

961 words - 4 pages This is just a : Do you want to live in this world essay.The Brave New WorldIn The Brave New World, their society is unique compared to the reality that I live in. They may have many advantages and disadvantages if it is compared to our society. Brave New World's utopia would be nice to have in our society. Having to place myself in their world would never happen. I do not think living in the utopia of brave new world would suit me.Living in

Brave New World, By Aldous Huxley: Exploring Huxley's Accuracy Of The Future.

929 words - 4 pages Brave New World Essay TestBrave New RealitiesIn a high school bathroom, a young girl is casually taking narcotics, the twelfth visitor that the lavatories have seen this day for the same purpose. A man peers into a bottle in a science lab as he pours more DNA samples into the container. As a woman drives home from work, she repeats the phrase 'There's a little McDonalds, in everyone." Aldous Huxley created a remarkable world, one that introduced

The Dystopian Society Of Brave New World, By Aldous Huxley

1416 words - 6 pages A dystopia is an imaginary, imperfect place where those who dwell are faced with terrible circumstances. The novel Brave New World by Aldous Huxley illustrates the concept of a dystopia. A utopia is an ideal place where everything is perfect, but in the novel, it becomes apparent that the author is trying to demonstrate the negative effects on a society when it attempts to become an unreachable utopian society. Brave New World is seen as a

Brave New World (By: Aldous Huxley)

1278 words - 5 pages the government. Basically, it is a seen as a 'perfect' world. However, More's idealistic perception leaves great room for influenced writers such as Aldous Huxley and George Orwell to disapprove and oppose his ideas. His idealistic perceptions are contrasted in other literary novels such as 1984 and Brave New World. Both novels contradict More's Utopia, because the societies in 1984 and Brave New World are dystopias. True happiness is never