Satirical Comedy In Canterbury Tales Essay

701 words - 3 pages

Satirical Comedy in Canterbury Tales The Canterbury Tales, by Chaucer, shows satirical comedy with the thirty pilgrims on their journey to Canterbury Cathedral in London. He shows how each of their errors or "foibles" is dramatized in their lives and in their vocation. Chaucer sets his satiric opinions of church related people. The best expression of this is the Prioress, Friar, and the Monk.The Prioress in comparison to Mother Theresa shows how Chaucer ridicules the prioress for being too dainty. She thinks highly of herself and is too good for some things, "she never let a morsel fall from her lips, nor wet her fingers too deeply in the sauce", therefore also must having cared a great deal about her appearance, for she would never do anything unbecoming of a "lady", anyways not that of lady of a gods. Nuns as she was, are considered to be married to God, and should have their minds set in that realm, but "she took much pleasure in proper etiquette". Not worshiping or spreading the thought of God. Mother Theresa on the other hand showed love and compassion to all humanity, mainly to God and what God wanted for His people. She did not examine closely how she ate her food or if a mouse died. Instead she rejoiced in the fact that the deceased was now with God, and more happy in heaven.The Friar compared to Friar John in Robin Hood, to how one man of Church is wanton and greed. The Friars did one job in particular that went against all morals in the church, when someone would go to him and ask for forgiveness he would be very lenient, " He was an easy man in giving penance where he knew he would gain a good pittance;" He thought only of his selfish greed, where as Friar John was exactly opposite, he would steal from the rich and give to the poor, although stealing in itself was wrong it was for the best for those in need. When someone needed penance he would give him or...

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