School Reform Essay

899 words - 4 pages ✓ Expert Reviewed

As noted by the graph our standings in education is below average, especially with African Americans and Hispanic children compared to other states. If this is the outcome in elementary school what should we expect by grade 8. With all of the various reforms enacted throughout the 30 years the curriculum in public schools did not improve nor did our standing compared to the rest of the world. Even though in each presidency monitoring tool was developed to ascertain the level of learning based on the test. In states where students passing their test equated to more funding of the school as well as the school remains open, jobs for the educators. So oppose to teaching students the information needed educators taught to the test. This is due to politicians not addressing the core issues that prevent children in low social economic status of of color due to cultural biases. Then there is the political climate of education including ignorance towards the benefit of vocational schools and real world learning.
In addition the changes in policies to address the substandard public school educational system did not resolve the issue was because before a program can get started another president was coming into office and the staff was replaced. With educational policies made by the federal government it left the state and local government unsure and in a state of flux. In essence there was no consistency in the implementation of programs to improve the educational outcomes of children in disadvantaged communities. Because of the inadequacies of the public school system and the inability to address the class sizes, the decaying school buildings, and children flunking out of school, charter schools and voucher programs were established to assist parents in being able to navigate their children to schools which were more productive in teaching.

History and origin of problem in education
There are many factors why the problem with public school education began to decline and politics hurt education in the 1980’s. The main factors are the change in the demographics of the population in urban communities. In the past public schools were a motivating tool for children to learn, the teachers were invested in teaching the lesson and they were qualified to do so. Then came inflation and single parent households were more parents had to work. This left many children home alone in the evenings, and limited afterschool programs for the children to attend to assist them with homework due to cuts in funding in low income communities.
With regards to the demographic change in the 1980s there was a rise in immigration from various countries. Many of the immigrants were non-English-speaking Hispanics and Asians. This required...

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