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Scout's Childhood Simplicity In Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird

715 words - 3 pages

The adult world is a cold and terrifying place. There are robberies, shootings, murders, suicides, and much more. If you were to be a small child, perhaps age 5, and you were to look in at this world, you would never know how bad it actually was, just from a single glance. Children have a small slice of ignorant bliss, which helps to keep them away from the harsh of reality. It isn’t until later, when they encounter something that opens their eyes and shows them, that they truly start to understand the world we live it. Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird shows the many differences between the simplicity of being a kid and the tough decisions and problems that adults must face every day.
Jean Louise Finch, or Scout, is a very innocent character. Some of the time she does not understand what is going on in the world around her until her father, Atticus, explains it to her. Scout is innocent in that she does not understand what she is doing or what impact her words have on others, but she is not as innocent as some other children are. Atticus always explains things to her, and therefore, even from a very young age, she has a grasp on some of the things that are wrong in the world. She may not understand them fully, or comprehend the reasoning behind it all, but she realizes it is there, and she does what she can with the knowledge she has.
Bob Yule is a very corrupt character. He beats his daughter, he doesn’t care for his children, and in the end of the book he tries to harm Scout and Jem, just because their father defended a black man in court. Once his mind is made up, he will not change his course of action, which leads to his own demise. We do not know where Mr. Yule went wrong, or when he changed, but we do have in comparison his daughter, Mayella. She was simply following her father’s lead in court, and though she lied under oath, she still had a certain...

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