Sea In New Zealand Essay

1775 words - 8 pages

Introduction
Assessments of potential environmental consequences are being a major concern of many states to be incorporated in policy, planning, and programmatic levels. The reasons behind the growth of interest in Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) are mainly focused on the limitations of project-level environmental assessment and requirements of assessment in strategic level (Lee and Walsh, 1992). Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) refers to a systematic process of analyzing environmental effects of policies, plans and programmes (Dalal-Clayton and Sadler, 2005). SEA is rising as an attempt of systematically assess environmental impacts of decisions made at strategic level. The requirement of SEA have been identified theoretically earlier, but practice is relatively recent and outlined to the mid 1980s. In recent times SEA is being used as an effective tool in the integration of environmental concerns in decision-making process along with the moving trend toward sustainability goals (Partidario, 1996). Although there are similarities between SEA and EIA and they share main objectives, one of the main differences in practical significance is SEA is applied at an earlier stage of planning process. To have a complete influence in decision making, SEA should be incorporated in various stages of the whole decision making process. The theory of SEA supports that there could be tiering of strategic actions, from policy to plan, to program and then finally to project but in practice stages are often skipped in most of the cases (Therivel, 2012). This paper will discuss about the context and opportunity of SEA in New Zealand. The extent to which SEA has become a central part of the decision making process in New Zealand will be explored along with identifying the gaps between SEA theory and practice.
SEA in New Zealand
The experience of Environmental Assessment (EA) could be traced in 1970s in New Zealand which was primarily focused on project level. Key principles and component of EA in strategic level has been first integrated in Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA) which is the key environmental legislation of the country. One main aim of RMA was to integrate aspects of EA and statutory planning process (Wilson and Ward, 2011). To date, there is no legal requirement or authorization for SEA in New Zealand and the term SEA could not be found in any legislation of this country. The acts refers to general obligations to consider potential environmental impacts of policy and plans which are being developed but it does not set down any specific process for SEA. Then the components of ES have been integrated subsequently in other environmental and planning laws of New Zealand like transport sector and local government legislation (McGimpsey and Morgan, 2013). RMA doesn’t require a separate assessment process of environmental issues, it aims of including environmental assessment issues as a part of policy making...

Find Another Essay On SEA in New Zealand

Air Pollution in New Zealand Essay

1847 words - 8 pages found that in analysing all of the air pollutants, the long term exposure effects from PM₁₀ were most significant (Health Research Council, 2012). The number of premature deaths due to air pollutants from a transport source was measured as 399 per year in New Zealand for over 30 year olds with the largest portion of those occurring in Auckland with 253 deaths (Ministry of Transport, 2002). In saying this, it is difficult to separate out the

Bullying in New Zealand Schools Essay

3535 words - 15 pages A keyword search on the most popular New Zealand news website nzherald.co.nz reports 783 articles including the keywords “Bullying in Schools” dating as far back as 1999 (Alexia Internet Inc., n.d.; The New Zealand Herald, 2014) . In 2013 alone there were 82 articles written using the same keywords, which equates to atleast one being reported every week. In 2012 there were 135 matches or atleast 2 a week. It is safe to say this is a sizable

Childhood Obesity in New Zealand

2634 words - 11 pages Childhood obesity is a growing problem not only in New Zealand but worldwide. This is due to many factors and has many effects on society. Obesity is defined as having a body mass index (BMI) of greater than 30. BMI is a measure of your weight divided by your height, the normal range is considered to be from 18 to 25 and over 30 is said to be obese. BMI became an international standard for obesity measurement in the 1980s (S.Wilson, 2000

Managing Diversity in New Zealand

2461 words - 10 pages perspectives. These include the associated benefits and challenges in managing an ethnically diverse workplace, as well as the various views relating to Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and diversity management. It will come to show that the only way for New Zealand (NZ) to move forward in the changing corporate environment, is to adopt change and embrace ethnic diversity in order to achieve organisational success. Managing diversity has become an

Kelly’s Experience in New Zealand

1012 words - 5 pages On Friday, the day after Kelly arrived in New Zealand, there was a girl knocked on her door and introduced herself. That girl which name is Christina lives near Kelly and she is 17 years old. Kelly is so glad that she got a new friend here in such a short time. Kelly and Christina became close friends in no time. They are in almost the same age, like the same thing and have the same attitude about love. Kelly told her about Ishmael and her life

Challenges in Hospitality Industry in New Zealand

1643 words - 7 pages In most countries, the hospitality sector is viewed as an important sector in the economy. The sector creates wealth and generates significant income to the nation’s GDP (Aquapark, October 1, 2013). The business also tends to employ thousands and thousands of people who generate their daily bread from the industry. Despite these benefits, the hospitality business is characterized by high risks of losing its potential. In New Zealand, the

Sports Culture in New Zealand: Rugby

899 words - 4 pages Sports Culture in New Zealand Perspective Sport Culture rugby, in particular plays a major role in the creation of New Zealand’s national identity over the past 140 years. New Zealand is identifiable with its strong ties to Rugby on an international scale. Introduced as contact sport by European men it grew, Rugby Union Clubs began to emerge in cities and towns all over the nation. Sport culture allowed pakeha and Maori to unite, as

Social Marketing in New Zealand – SunSmart

1349 words - 5 pages 1.Introduction:New Zealand is a famous tourist attraction, not only the beautiful scenery but also the beautiful sunlight brings the good reputation. However, the potential threat behind the beautiful sunlight. It also brings excessively irradiation to New Zealander, causes the high proportion of skin cancer. Therefore, this report will focus on the social marketing issues in New Zealand, deal with Auckland Cancer Society. The report will

Class in contemporary New Zealand Society

1459 words - 6 pages in a world whose novelty has been variously signalled by the prefix of 'post' (Ongley, 2013). This is especially true in New Zealand, a country widely believed to have been class-less from the beginning. However, as will be shown, these beliefs, this source of national pride is based on a myth. Not only will class divisions in the form of social inequality be shown to exist today, but the theories of Marx can still be used in examining New

Environment Managment Paradigms in New Zealand

1916 words - 8 pages (2012) are not true to the New Zealand environmental management practice. The majority of New Zealand’s environmental paradigms are rooted in the integration of land and water management. In New Zealand, regional and unitary councils are responsible for environmental management under the Resource Management Act 1991 (McNeill, Cheyne, & Summers, 2013) within a devolved management framework with links the council with the general public and key

Koru and kowhaiwhai in New Zealand painting

2536 words - 10 pages Pakeha artists have spurned great debate in New Zealand. Pakeha artists have been seen by many to have created works using koru and kowhaiwhai problematically placing the motifs in a distorted context. Further difficulties have arisen with the question about who owns this cultural capital and what rights people have over it, producing an antagonism between biculturalism and cultural sovereignty. This essay will examine Koru and Kowhaiwhai and

Similar Essays

Billabon In New Zealand Essay

1132 words - 5 pages participate in, including snow boarding (newzealand.com, 2005), one of the Billabong companies special interests. Offering Billabong gear, clothing, and accessories, along with possible ski tournaments that could be held on Mount Cook, which rises 3,700 feet above sea level and is always covered in snow, could help New Zealand get that extra boost it’s willing to take economic risk on (The World Factbook, 2005

Health In New Zealand Essay

1771 words - 8 pages This essay discusses the determinants of health in New Zealand with a focus on maternity care in rural areas. The main determinants of health in New Zealand are the social, cultural and economic factors such as genetics, income, education, poverty, culture, occupation and housing. The second part of this essay goes on to describe how objectives of the New Zealand Health Strategy (NZHS) can have a positive impact on health care in New Zealand

Health Literacy In New Zealand Essay

1581 words - 6 pages appropriate health decisions (Health Navigator NZ, 2013). Results from the 2006 Adult Literacy & Life Skills Survey found approximately 1.6 million New Zealand adults have low health literacy skills (Workbase, n.d). Furthermore, Maori between the ages of 16 and 65 have the poorest health literacy in comparison to non-Maori across all of the measured variables (Ministry of Health, 2010). Reduced health literacy, according to international research

Religious Expression In New Zealand Essay

890 words - 4 pages In New Zealand, religion is continually changing to keep up with the ever-changing society around it. Various cults and sects have come into existence as a result of this unstable society we live in here in New Zealand. It is hard to call such groups a religion as they match the characteristics of a typical religion such as the Catholic Church or Buddhism. However people still continue to follow these false religions as they believe that these