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Security In Healthcare: How Bring Your Own Device (Byod) Violates Health Insurance Portability And Accountability Act (Hipaa)

1209 words - 5 pages

Bring Your Own Device policy (BYOD) in health care organizations is a growing trend that shows a considerably positive effect that few people could notice any violations that may accompany it. The policy allows staff in an organization to carry their personal electronic devices like mobile phones, computers, and laptops to facilitate their work by helping store and access certain information (Herzig 20).
Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) was enacted in 1996. It entails security and privacy regulations constructed to ensure good security measures are applied to protect patient data in health facilities, especially where BYOD policy is active. The policies provided in HIPAA also ensure that only authorized people access information stored in the devices used by health providers (Powell 1-2).
HIPAA security regulations offer standards for ensuring that patient data on electronic devices are safeguarded. HIPAA cover how we can use and disclose patient information while the HIPAA privacy policies explain how patient information should be accessed and disclosed. Schneider (55) reviews that violation of HIPAA security and privacy laws majorly entail the attainment, retrieving and using medical information by a person who is not subject to the health data or is not permitted to offer medical services.
How BYOD can violate HIPAA security/privacy laws
Lack of Confidentiality
BYOD policy may not promote confidentiality and integrity, which is a major requirement in the HIPAA regulations (Health Information Privacy). Health providers should come up with strategies to follow up on and protect information they have concerning their client. 5111 Physical Security Policy ensures that the security of the devices used by patients is highly considered because most cases of data breaches happen due to loss of the mobile numbers and the devices used for data transfer and storage (Schneider).
Lack of Encrypted Data
When a health facility sign for BYOD policy but neglect encrypting their information, this violates HIPAA security and privacy policy that advocates for highly monitored security of devices and applications used for storing information (Privacy under HIPAA, 86). If data is not encrypted, it may lead to breach of information thus diminish of confidential element of health records. Storing health records of patients in an individual device is not only prone to being lost but also easily available o rendering and manipulation of provided information in the device due to lack of control ("BYOD Risks & Rewards" para. 1).
Wrong Transfer of Information
Beaver and Herold (9) specify that BOYD policy is subject to mistakenly information transfer to unauthorized people data online by mistake. Privacy policy 5123 Electronic Communication of Health Related Information gives procedures on how to avoid privacy errors while communicating electronically. Electronic mistakes may be due to careless misplacement of unencrypted information or...

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