Self Reflection And John Locke Essay

1525 words - 6 pages

John Locke talks of the gradual opening of conscious mind which according to him is initially empty (a tabula rasa). This empty mind, a tabula rasa, is shaped by sensations and reflections or experiences in general. In some thoughts concerning education, Locke expressed his belief on the importance of education in development of man. He says that the extent of their goodness and usefulness boils down to their education (Piel, 2002). The impressions that the mind gets in childhood are lasting and form the basis of self. He expressed this in his “associations of ideas” and his views on this later came to be known as “assocationism”. Associationism as a theory was very influential and warned parents from allowing their children have to develop negative associations.
Rousseau believed that education should teach the pupil mastery of self to live a virtuous life in a world which is not perfect (Fingerman, & Lang, 2004). He believed that proper environment and guidance form a tutor will guide the student through the learning experiences. The experiences of the results of right and wrong rather than physical punishment are learning tools. This view is shared by modern psychologists. He advocated for developmentally appropriate education to match the need to the child at every stage of its development.
John Bowlby had a keen interest in child development and concentrated his research on that. His research on the mental health of the homeless kids on Europe after the war led to the conclusion that lack of warm and continuous relationship between a mother and kid affects the mental health of the kid negatively (Newman, P., & Newman, B., 2007). Although the results of his findings were contested, recent developments have confirmed that the child’s experiences in interpersonal relationships early in life are important to their psychological development. John Bowlby’s work on attachment theory stresses that young kids form emotional attachments to parents, guardians or caregiver if they are responsive to the child (Rider, & Sigelman, 2008). Due to the emotional attachment formed, in time of distress, children seek to be close to the caregiver or familiar people and use them also as a base in their exploration of the environment. Emotional attachments formed as a child form the basis of emotional and personality development. In some instances, the behavior the toddler develops towards some familiar people, be they parents, siblings, or others, influences their behavior towards the same people later in life. Separating a toddler from familiar people impacts the child emotional and cognitive development negatively.
Considering the theories of John Locke, Jean-Jacque Rousseau and John Bowlby on child development in relation to caregivers and environment, I would say that they certainly explain my experience to a point. I say this because their explanations are generic and therefore in some ways, may not apply to individual cases. I must admit that education...

Find Another Essay On Self Reflection and John Locke

John Locke and The Egalitarian Principle

948 words - 4 pages Considered to be the ‘Father of classical liberalism,’ John Locke established the core values of classical liberalism, which included liberty, individualism, protection of natural rights, consent and constitutionalism. Classical liberalism that developed in the United States focused on a ‘minimal state’ in terms of government restriction while John Locke centralized his focus on the social and political means of the individual. Generally

John Locke, George Berkeley and David Hume

1333 words - 5 pages John Locke, Berkeley and Hume are all empiricist philosophers. They all have many different believes, but agree on the three anchor points; The only source of genuine knowledge is sense experience, reason is an unreliable and inadequate route to knowledge unless it is grounded in the solid bedrock of sense experience and there is no evidence of innate ideas within the mind that are known from experience. Each of these philosophers

Comparing John Locke and Thomas Hobbes

1232 words - 5 pages Thomas Hobbes and John Locke are two political philosophers who are famous for their theories about the formation of the society and discussing man in his natural state. Their theories are both psychologically insightful, but in nature, they are drastically different. Although they lived in the same timeframe, their ideas were derived from different events happening during this time. Hobbes drew his ideas on man from observation, during a

John Locke: Empiricism and Influencing Government

1400 words - 6 pages The English philosopher and physician John Locke was an immensely important and influential figure during the enlightenment period. Perhaps his most important and revolutionary work was An Essay Concerning Human Understanding; written in 4 separate books; each pertaining to a section of his explanation. Its purpose was to “to enquire into the original, certainty and extant of human knowledge, together with the grounds and degrees of belief

John Locke, George Berkeley, and David Hume

1378 words - 6 pages of such cognitive success. John Locke set the tone for enlightenment by affirming the foundational principle of empiricism: There is nothing in the intellect that was not previously in the senses. Locke could not accept the Cartesian rationalist belief in innate ideas. According to Locke, all knowledge of the world must ultimately rest on man's sensory experience. The mind arrives at sound conclusions through reflection after sensation. In other

Comparing John Locke, John Stuart Mill, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau

2042 words - 8 pages Comparing John Locke, John Stuart Mill, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau John Locke, John Stuart Mill, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau all dealt with the issue of political freedom within a society. John Locke's “The Second Treatise of Government”, Mill's “On Liberty”, and Rousseau’s “Discourse On The Origins of Inequality” are influential and compelling literary works which while outlining the conceptual framework of each thinker’s ideal state present

John Locke and Jean Jacques Rousseau on Equality and Democracy

1567 words - 6 pages Fighting for democracy in an age of monarchies in Europe, John Locke was a revolutionary thinker whose belief in human reason and self-rule inspired many intellectuals centuries after his death. Advocating the "general will," or actions and decisions for the good of the community rather than one's self, the insight of Jean-Jacques Rousseau is found in almost every hint of modern philosophy. Though in common they share theories on the state of

John Locke and the American Revolution and Glorious Revolution

2608 words - 10 pages John Locke, amongst other things, was a 17th century political philosopher who became renowned for his beliefs in the state of nature, natural law and the inalienable rights of man; often being referred to as the ‘Father of Liberalism’. At their time of writing, Locke’s ideas were considered to be revolutionary thoughts in an extremely conservative world; in which absolute power commonly ruled over the masses and where inequality simply went

John Locke: Illuminating Path to Life, Liberty, and Property

1375 words - 6 pages I. Introduction “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness” (“Declaration”). These words, spoken by a wise and prominent man by the name of Thomas Jefferson, were greatly influenced by the Enlightenment’s most profound philosopher, John Locke. Since the beginning of Enlightenment

John Locke: Illuminating Path to Life, Liberty, and Property

857 words - 4 pages I. Introduction “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness” (“Declaration”). These words, spoken by a wise and prominent man by the name of Thomas Jefferson, were greatly influenced by the Enlightenment’s most profound philosopher, John Locke. Since the beginning of Enlightenment

John Locke in Leviathan and Second Treatise of Government

1545 words - 7 pages When initially looking at the arguments of Thomas Hobbes and John Locke in Leviathan and Second Treatise of Government, they seem to agree on many things. Both philosophers believe that human reasoning is based on appetites and aversions, that humans have a fundamental right to self-preservation, and, above all, that a strong central government is the way to remedy the problems with the state of nature. However, after looking closely, many

Similar Essays

John Locke And His Philosophies Essay

1608 words - 7 pages John Locke, one of the most influential philosophers of his time, was born on August 29, 1632 in Wrington, a small village in England. His father, also named John, had been a lawyer as well as a military man who once served as a captain in the parliamentary army during the English civil war. Locke’s parents were both very devout Puritans and so to no surprise, Locke himself was raised with heavily Puritan beliefs. Because Locke’s father had

John Locke And Political Authority Essay

1888 words - 8 pages in the sense that it provides a sound framework based on the idea of property. However it only seems to cater towards the wealthy majority in society. His theory fails to represent the poor and the minorities. This is particularly so in reference to the lifetime membership to a society and the loss of land upon choosing to leave as a tacit member of the society. I would not be persuaded by a system of government that does not cater towards all the individuals in that society. Works Cited John locke David Hume Jean Hampton

John Locke And Government's Purpose Essay

994 words - 4 pages "Declaration of Independence." National Archives and Records Administration. Web. 01 Feb. 2012. . Fox, Frank W., and Clayne L. Pope. City upon a Hill: The Legacy of America's Founding. Provo, UT: BYU Academic Pub., 2010. Print. Locke, John. "Second Treatise of Civil Government by John Locke." Oregon State University. Web. 01 Feb. 2012. .

Self Assessment And Reflection Essay

1030 words - 4 pages Self-Assessment and Reflection      In the last seven weeks, I had an opportunity to look back and analyze the events that has shaped my life. This was a unique experience where I was emotionally comfortable enough to look back at life. I was able to objectively revisit many events that were often buried and too painful to face. I was free from the turmoil of emotional fears of failure, anger, regret and loneliness, which often clouded my