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The Pursuit Of A Dream In A Raisin In The Sun, The Achievement Of Desire And Fences

1635 words - 7 pages

Selfish Dream

Everyone has their dreams and whoever puts all his or her efforts and determination to pursuit that goal is the one who will succeed. However, there are dreamers who have misconceptions about the art of dreaming. In three pieces of literature I have encountered: “The Achievement of Desire” by Richard Rodriguez, “A Raisin in the Sun” by Lorraine Hansberry and “Fences” by August Wilson, its characters fight for their dreams regardless obstacles in their life. Nevertheless, when many people aim on achieving their goals, they expose their sense of self-absorbance. Dreaming and aspiration are human senses but when one considers his or her dream more important than others, dreaming becomes another aspect of selfishness.

To fulfill a dream requires dedication and sacrifice. In Richard Rodriquez’s “The Achievement of Desire,” the character has a dream of academic success. From early childhood, the “intelligent boy” indeed, finds pleasure from reading books. It is not an exaggeration to say that he absolutely gives up his social life to pursue education. He appears as a lonely kid who has no close friends or any serious social involvement. His boring life ties in the circle back and forth of school and home. However, it doesn’t seem to be a problem to him. He is always the kid who raises his hand during lecture and is his teachers’ favorite. The character exposes his selfishness self-importance during early time of schooling. He feels uncomfortable and unwilling when he is sent to a private school, which he considered a “ghetto class”. It is such a wrong perception when one refuses to engage in his or her community. By complication and excuses, he indirectly denies his identity as a working class child. Satisfying with compliments from teachers and classmates, the character feels proud of being superior to others. He just really finds the enthusiastic in studying later as he is sent to a better school that he gets much educational development. In brief, his success majorly comes from reserve privilege from parent’s assistance. “The scholarship boy” is essentially a type of the self who rather receives without giving.

On the other hand, the character in Richard Rodriquez’s story also suffers a lack of confidence and dissociation due to the wall he creates around himself. Blindingly pursuit his ideal life, most importantly, the man has lost his social skills which he assumes himself a “bad boy”. Even though the “scholarship boy” has enough intellectual knowledge to be aware of his temporary problems, he doesn’t make any changes. His selfishness dynamically expresses later on in adulthood, he tends to separates himself from his parents. It can be concluded that all of his success is come from the help and scarification of his parent. He would respect and appreciate them. However, he develops a sense of disrespect and ungrateful to his parents. The man obviously does nothing to compensate for his parent scarification “Your parent must be...

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