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Jane Austen's Sense And Sensibility Essay

1761 words - 8 pages

Love comes in many shapes and forms, whether it’s an inanimate object or a person you want to spend the rest of your life with. Jane Austen’s novel, “Sense and Sensibility”, revolves around two sisters who try to find true love, while requiring a balance of reason and emotion. Elinor and Marianne Dashwood are viewed as two completely different people. Elinor is known to represent “sense” while Marianne represents “sensibility.” In the novel, Jane Austen emphasizes two common women’s characteristics, and shows us how Elinor and Marianne both find love and happiness only by overcoming their struggles and learning from one another’s actions and mistakes.
It is clear that Marianne and Elinor are in fact two completely different people as we are shown by their traits and behaviors, “While Marianne is an emotional wreck, completely and utterly driven by her emotions, Elinor seems to be all sense and reason” (Manukyan). This quote explains the difference between the Dashwood sisters, explaining that Marianne is more into her emotions and Elinor is about facts and reason. The two show that they are completely different by the way they show their feelings in their love interests.
Elinor is nineteen years old; she’s very mature for her age and has common sense. Elinor portrays the “sense” of the title, and is different from her sister Marianne; she is practical, reserved and very thoughtful. She is able to control her feelings and see the more calm, practical way with her love interest, telling Marianne that she has feelings for Edward, “I do not attempt to deny that I think very highly of him, that I… greatly esteem him… I like him.” (Austen 35). Although she expressed this to Marianne she quickly brushes them off, “I by no means sure of his regard for me,” (Austen 35). As she says this you can clearly see the transition from Elinor expressing her feelings, but then controlling herself to being calm again.
Marianne is sixteen years old and is the complete opposite of her older sister; she doesn’t think before she acts, she’s all about being in the moment. Marianne is infatuated with Willoughby, “When he was present she had no eyes for anyone else,” (Austen 46). She was in love in a matter of minutes, “Everything he said was clever.” (Austen 46). this shows how quickly she opened her heart into loving a man, putting feelings before logic. “Marianne is so drowned by her passions that she does not even stop to think that Willoughby and her may not and will not be engaged” (Manukyan). The sisters develop heartbreaks by their two love interests and it sheds light on how their emotions change the plot of the story.
Both Elinor and Marianne get their hearts broken by the men they loved. In the beginning, Elinor meets a man named Edward Ferrars and the two immediately click almost like they were meant for one another. They soon face troubles when they find out others don’t find them good enough for each other. Marianne tells Elinor that she finds Edward too...

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