Setting As Catalyst For Passion In Kate Chopin's The Storm

669 words - 3 pages

Setting as Catalyst for Passion in The Storm   
   

The setting for "The Storm" by Kate Chopin begins with a thunderstorm. The first characters that the author mentions are Bobinot and his son Bibi. They buy a can of shrimps for Calixta but are prevented from getting them to her by the storm (Chopin, 96). The author changes the setting and tells about Calixta at home. A man named Alcee arrives at her house that she has not seen in a long time. The violence of the storm forces Alcee and Calixta into the house and then into passion that ends at the same time as the storm. Chopin uses setting as a catalyst to this action, a parallel to the passion between the characters, and as a key to the theme of the story.

Setting in this story is the catalyst to the passion that occurs between Alcee and Calixta. The storm occurs just as Alcee rides by. Calixta has to go out to get Bibi's coat and sees Alcee. The storm forces Alcee and Calixta into the house and makes them shut the door (96). The fact that the door to the bedroom is open and the big white bed can be seen, contributes to the setting by foreshadowing future events. The storm obscures the view of other cabins and implies that they are totally alone in the house with no one to see them. They are trapped together in the world of the storm and cannot leave. Lightning strikes the tree and makes Calixta fall backward into Alcee's arms (97). The setting in "The Storm" forces Alcee and Calixta together and into each other's arms.

The storm serves as a parallel to the passion between Alcee and Calixta. The storm is unavoidable and so is the passion because of it. When the storm forces them into each other's arms, the familiarity with their previous lives takes over and they begin having an affair (97). The storm ending at the same time as the passion, implies that they are parallel...

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