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Gender Roles Essay

1071 words - 5 pages

How is an individual’s anatomy a prime focus on how others view that individual? Are we as human beings able to go beyond a person’s anatomy and truly judge them based on only the content of their character? The way in which we view people based on their genetic makeup conforms us to think that a male or female can only engage in activities based on their gender role in society. By conforming to the gender roles that our society has placed on us, poses a threat to the 21st century. In doing that, we setback our society and prevent it from growing beyond gender roles and the content of an individual’s character. The problem with going beyond judging people by anatomy is how to actually formulize a plan on how to exactly judge a person based on the content of their character. Cultural differences, around the world, in the communication of male and female roles play a huge part in overcoming the 21st century challenge of anatomy and gender makeup.
The speaker, Alice Dreger, believes that a resolution to the 21st century challenge of anatomy and gender is if we think less about each individual’s anatomic makeup and focus more on what that person can do for us. Alice Dreger believes in the odd occurrences of how a person can be a female on the outside but have internal male reproductive organs. She believes that an individual who that happens to has a right to still play his or her external gender role. She believes that just because an individual happened to be born with different internal reproductive organs that the circumstance shouldn’t change how others view them. An individual can still live their lifestyle as what they are externally but they just won’t be able to reproduce that way. The fact that not everyone will know this about that individual is another reason why they shouldn’t be judged based upon it. But just because Alice Dreger believes this doesn’t mean everyone else will which is a weakness in resolving this 21st century challenge of gender differences.
In terms of evolutionary psychology, there are certain traits each gender cannot get rid of. For example, an average male seeks to be able to reproduce with no constraints while the average female wisely seeks who she will reproduce with (Myers 24). This alone causes a difference in how individuals view each other. A female may call a male who wants to reproduce a lot without considering who the mother is, a “dog” or a “whore”. But these terms have only been created by our society and the constraints we have put on male versus female. If our society didn’t create those terms for a male who participates in reproducing vastly then a female wouldn’t bother judging that male for his activities. This difference between male and female affects how we will resolve gender differences. If we cannot get past these condescending terms how can we get past what role a gender is “supposed” to have? Naturally we have been born with certain instincts specific to our gender. For instance, a female...

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