Sexuality In "To His Coy Mistress" And "The Flea"

891 words - 4 pages

Be sure to begin each paper with a title.

Let's talk about sex; in today's culture one cannot get through the day without viewing billboards, commercials, advertisements, movies, and talk shows which in one way or another are related to sex or the art of seduction. It is believed by many that the current generation is undoubtedly the most sexually explicit generation by far. However, it is not that the current generation is the more occupied with sex than past generations, but, that this generation lacks the finesse that was an essential component in the art of seduction for generations past. Furthermore, seduction has been the game most played throughout the centuries, as males endeavor to convince or entice the fairer sex to share their beds. As an example, consider Marvell's "To His Coy Mistress" as well as Donne's "The Flea," the speakers make a sinful proposal, which is cunningly backed up with an extremely broad-minded argument that is presented to each female after the speaker's primary request has been declined. The methods of persuasion employed by each are completely different but are unified in their purpose: to coax or trick the fair maiden into saying yes.

Though both authors present superbly developed arguments, Marvell's has a nicer, more polished style. In "To His Coy Mistress" and "The Flea," one might realize that in both speakers he can find an embodiment of the craftiness of men on the hunt for their prey. The Speaker, in both poems, makes an unassuming but declinable offer for sex to his maiden of choice, and, upon rejection, each male embarks on a fluent yet rhetorical argument as to why the maiden should embrace and accept his simple offer of passion. For Marvell, the argument remains that there isn't enough time left in the world, and the maiden should partake in indulgence before it is too late: "But at my back I always hear Time's winged chariot hurrying near" (Lines 21-22). He also states the unpleasant fact that, otherwise, will be enjoying her virginity instead of him. He does this to suggest that if she continues to waste time, she will die a virgin: "Then worms shall try that long preserv'd virginity." (Lines 27-28)

Donne, on the other hand, revolves his argument around the existence of a metaphorical flea. In this poem, it is the speaker's claim that the flea represents his union with the maiden in matrimony, since the flea has taken blood from them both: "It suck'd me first and now...

Find Another Essay On Sexuality in "To His Coy Mistress" and "The Flea"

Comparison of how The Flea and To His Coy Mistress Present and Develop the Poets' Arguments

2014 words - 8 pages The Flea and To His Coy Mistress are two poems written by poets living during the Renaissance Period. To His Coy Mistress was written by Andrew Marvell and The Flea was written by John Donne. Both of these poets were well-educated 'metaphysical poets', and these poems illustrate metaphysical concerns, highly abstract and theoretical ideas, that the poets would have been interested in. Both poems are based around the same idea of trying to reason

The Flea by John Donne and To His Coy Mistress by Andrew Marvell

6073 words - 24 pages The Flea by John Donne and To His Coy Mistress by Andrew Marvell "The Flea" by John Donne is written in the 17th century as is "To his coy mistress" by Andrew Marvell. This we can see by the language used which was typical of that period in time "apt to kill me" and "yea" which are taken from the flea. Both poems also speak of virginity being very important, especially before marriage because if a woman had lost her "maidenhead" before

Comparing Andrew Marvell's To His Coy Mistress and John Donne's Flea

744 words - 3 pages Andrew Marvell’s To His Coy Mistress and John Donne’s Flea Andrew Marvell and John Donne both wrote “carpe diem” poetry full of vivid imagery and metaphysical conceits. This message can be clearly seen in the poems "To His Coy Mistress" by Marvell and Donne’s "Flea." Though both poems take a similar approach to the topic addressed, it is Marvell that writes more thoughtfully and carefully, coercing instead of Donne’s seemed demanding

"To His Coy Mistress"

1160 words - 5 pages "To His Coy Mistress" Andrew Marvell's "To His Coy Mistress is a sieze the moment kind of poem in which an anonomyous young man tries to woo the hand of his mistress. This kind of poem gives the reader the idea that time is not only precious, but scarce. The speaker uses many smooth tatics to persuade the young girl, starting with compliments and ending with a more forceful, morbid appraoch. "To His Coy Mistress" is not only witty but

To His Coy Mistress

1155 words - 5 pages The speaker of “To His Coy Mistress” is a man with a high libido addressing an unwilling woman who is guarding her virginity. Marvell uses figures of speech to unify his theme of Carpe Diem, to seize the day, in order for the speaker to seduce the woman. The first Stanza of the poem signifies that his love is as everlasting as time. Whereas, in the second Stanza he realizes that time is of the essence and the woman must give in to his desires

To His Coy Mistress

1209 words - 5 pages ! “ Thy beauty shall no longer be found.” He is starting to see that he is never going to gety in to her “Marble Vault.”(chp. 6 Crti. App). That she is playing a game, and their is no use. In “ To His Coy Mistress” Andrew Wrote, “Nor, in thy marble vualt, shall sound/ My echoing song; the worms shall try that long perserved virginiy.” Rebecca west wrote about how violent his words have become when he was talking about how the worms would violate

To His Coy Mistress

752 words - 3 pages Words on "To His Coy Mistress"      Either you have sex with me or you die. This is a very strong statement which, when said, has to get someone's attention; and that is exactly what Andrew Marvell intends for the reader in this poem. He wants the undivided attention of this mistress so that he can scare her and rush her into making a decision the way he wants and in due time. Filled with time

To his coy mistress

571 words - 2 pages The speaker in Andrew Marvell's "To His Coy Mistress" is a man who is addressing a silent listener, who happens to be his mistress. In this dramatic monologue the speaker tries to explain his feelings to his mistress. The speaker uses many allusions to empires and other objects, events and ideas that are not directly related to his feelings, in order to explain how he feels. He uses these allusions to exaggerate his feelings in order to clearly

Love in To His Coy Mistress and Remember

1116 words - 4 pages Love in To His Coy Mistress and Remember On first outlook it would that To His Coy Mistress and Remember both share the topic of love. They seem to be of direct relevance to each other, whereas upon closer inspection, To His Coy Mistress does not attempt to express any emotion at all. Instead, THCM is ultimately physical and portrays a man’s desperation and lust, The persona of THCM has written this poem as a

Ruined Maid and To His Coy Mistress

722 words - 3 pages Ruined Maid and To His Coy Mistress Both the “Ruined Maid” and “To His Coy Mistress” provide us with disturbing images / pictures of love, sex and relationships as I am about to explain. The “Ruined Maid” was written by Thomas Hardy in 1866, during the time when women didn’t have sex before marriage and they were thrown out of their village for being “ruined”. The public at that point in history had a very strict view of sex and

The Tones The Sun Rising and To His Coy Mistress

1162 words - 5 pages The Tones The Sun Rising and To His Coy Mistress The sun rising John Donne (1572-1631) I feel that this poem is written from a perspective that gives the sun power, however it also makes the king sound of great power and importance almost to rival the sun. I am incline to believe that the poet would or might have been commissioned by the king to write poems, so that fact that the king is seen as all powerful

Similar Essays

Love In To His Coy Mistress And The Flea

2847 words - 11 pages Love in To His Coy Mistress and The Flea Both 'To His Coy Mistress', by Andrew Marvell (1621-1678) and 'The Flea', by John Donne (1572-1631) present different attitudes to love. Both are also structured very differently and occasionally use contrasting imagery. Each poem was written in the 17th century, just after the Renaissance. The poets were metaphysical poets. Although the 'metaphysic' was originally a derogatory

Poetry Comparison On The Flea And To His Coy Mistress

1169 words - 5 pages Poetry Comparison on The Flea and To His Coy Mistress I would firstly like to begin on 'The Flea'. This poem is about a man that is trying to persuade a woman to have sex with him, by symbolically using a flea. The content of the poem is very much the same throughout the whole of the poem. In the first stanza, the poet is basically talking about how the flea represents their coming together and in the last two

Seduction Techniques Illustrated In Donne's The Flea And Marvell's To His Coy Mistress

906 words - 4 pages . Donne’s “The Flea” and Marvell’s “To His Coy Mistress” both have seduction techniques, yet the degree of success is different. The degree of success each seducer has can be judged by looking at the rhetoric, imagery and emotional appeals in “The Flea” and “To His Coy Mistress.” The seducer of “The Flea” makes use of different arguments to convince the woman to have sex. One argument is that the blood of both him and his lover has mingled inside a

Love In To His Coy Mistress, Shall I Compare Thee, Let Me Not, And The Flea

2905 words - 12 pages Love in "To His Coy Mistress", "Shall I Compare Thee," "Let Me Not," and "The Flea" The four poems I am going to be comparing are, “To His Coy Mistress,” “Shall I Compare Thee,” “Let Me Not,” and “The Flea.” All four of these poems are based on the subject matter of love. The four poems have a lot in common but each poem touches a different aspect of love. Two of the poems, “Shall I Compare Thee”, and “Let Me Not”, are sonnets and both