This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Shakespeare's Julius Caesar And Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

1026 words - 5 pages

Conflicting perspectives are an innate corollary of the subjective human experience. Shakespeare's 'Julius Caesar' explores disparate representations of events and personalities to give rise to truth and the language in which it is expressed as innately unstable. Moreover, Julius Caesar and Aldous Huxley's 'Brave New World' offer disparate class perspectives to undermine the possibility of truth as anything but iridescent and personal.
Shakespeare evinces perspectives of situations, events and characters as innately conflicting, as the impossibility of a single and stable objective reality comes to advocate the embrace of truth and meaning as endlessly deferred and enigmatic. The Stoic ...view middle of the document...

Hence, through hitherto expounded disparate representations, we are positioned to embrace truth as subjective and personal.
While Shakespeare offers conflicting perspectives as symptomatic of a more general subjectivity of meaning, Huxley offers disparate Romantic and Capitalistic discourses of high art and everyday consumption. John the Savage embodies a Romantic embrace of the experiential nuance of human experience, though the rhetorical question "Is there not something in living dangerously?", only for Mustapha Mond, the resident World Controllor, to responds through the intertextual allusion "That's why we administer the Violent Passion Syndrome. Its the complete physiological equivalent of fear and rage. All the tonic effects of murdering Desdemona without the inconvenience" as the experiential is reduced to the empirical and human becomes just another variable into the equation for the perpetuation of hegemony and stability. Similarly, Cassius self-representation as benevolent through the kinesthetic imagery "I do fawn on men and hug them hard" is contradicted when Brutus intimates Cassius' corruption through the colour imagery "and you mart your offices for gold", as Shakespeare represents conflicting perspectives as due to the fallability of human perceptions and attitudes. Thus, Huxley's discourses of the collective, shown through the conduplicatio "Everyone works for everyone else. We can't do without anyone" , and the huances of individual identity, as Bernard Marx is characterised by the quasi-tautologous "I'd rather be myself, not somebody else" as human behaviours are subject to, and causations of , incommensurate ideological viewpoints.
Shakespeare explores the linguistic manifestations of conflicting perspectives, to demonstrate language to be innately gendered, politicised and ideologised. Shakespeare elucidates dichotomous representations of the female, contrasting Portia's sibilance "Think you that I am no stronger than my sex. Being so husbanded" with Cassius misogynistic metaphor "Our fathers' minds are dead and we are govern'd with out mothers' spirits;" as the audience cannot escape the associative and connotative semiotic structures imbued within language that is shown to be innately patriarchal. The contrary courses of action favoured by Cassius and Brutus, the former wishing for "Antony and Caesar to" metaphorically "fall together" and the latter wishes to exercise restraint and...

Find Another Essay On Shakespeare's Julius Caesar and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

Aldous Huxley's Brave New World Essay

771 words - 3 pages In the "Brave New World" of 632 A. F. (After Ford), universal human happiness has been achieved. (Well, almost.) Control of reproduction, genetic engineering, conditioning--especially via repetitive messages delivered during sleep--and a perfect pleasure drug called "Soma" are the cornerstones of the new society. Reproduction has been removed from the womb and placed on the conveyor belt, where reproductive workers

Overview of Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

1543 words - 6 pages experiences in Italy under the reign of fascist leader Benito Mussolini (Barron's Educational Series). Huxley was deeply troubled by threats to individual freedom and independence; in Europe in the 1920’s and early 1930’s, these were threatened by the rise of totalitarian governments (Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World Historical Context). Huxley envisions the birth of a scientific dictatorship, which slowly exorcises individuality out of

Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World

1466 words - 6 pages Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World The New World, a man-made Utopia, governed by its motto, Community, Identity, Stability (Huxley 3). A man-made world in every way. Human beings fertilized in bottles. Identity, gender, intelligence, position in society, all predestined. Human beings classified in the order of precedence: Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, and Epsilon. Every one conditioned to be a certain way. Every one works for every one else

Happiness in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

708 words - 3 pages When we look to define happiness, many different ideas come to mind. Webster’s New Collegiate Dictionary uses three definitions for happiness: good fortune, a state of well being and contentment, and a pleasurable satisfaction. In Brave New World, Aldus Huxley argues that a society can redefine happiness through the government’s manipulation of the environment and the human mind itself. The government accomplishes this by mind

Utopian Society in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

1102 words - 5 pages . Shockingly it takes those influential medicinal plants as a rule to open one up to the higher truths or much reflection. In an immaculate social order, people don't have to depend on medications to keep social order in equalization. In Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, social order is dependent upon keeping everybody blissful and if for reasons unknown somebody gets miserable then there is dependably soma- the "ideal" drug. People are molded from the

Analysis of Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World

890 words - 4 pages when Helmholtz requests a "thoroughly bad climate" because he will attain a higher pleasure, creativity, while experiencing externally bad conditions. Therefore, I am under the impression that cwould reply that his story of a Brave New World was written to point out how utilitarianism can erode freedom of thought and the ability of science to discover new truths. Works Cited Rachels, James and Rachels, Stuart. The Elements of Moral Philosophy, Fifth Edition, New York: McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. 2007. PP 68-88,141-159

Huxley's "Brave New World"

1130 words - 5 pages scientific possibilities of the future might be a new line" (Aldous Huxley)On having a look at the time line one can see that Huxley wrote Brave New World in 1931, before Adolph Hitler came to power in Germany and before Joseph Stalin started the purges that killed millions of people in the Soviet Union. He therefore had no immediate real-life reason to make tyranny and terror major elements of his story. Because Brave New World describes a dystopia, it

Comparison of Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" and Ridley Scott's "Blade Runner"

1438 words - 6 pages Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" and Ridley Scott's "Blade Runner" are both predominantly science fiction texts, which represent concerns for humanity in the wild. Conversely, these dystopian texts have been composed in largely varying social, cultural and historical contexts, producing differing themes for both the composer and responder. Ultimately, changes in context affect the composer's implicit beliefs as to whether or not the current

Stability, Silence, and Progression: Analysis of Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World

1392 words - 6 pages . East Carolina University desires that the inner needs of progression and companionship of the viewer fulfill themselves for the benefit of the university, and eventually, the viewer itself. In his novel Brave New World, Aldous Huxley’s society abolishes solitude by conditioning the citizens to always surround each other, stunting progress, whereas East Carolina University instigates progression by encouraging students to interact with their

Will Aldous Huxley's Brave New World Be Our Brave New World?

1276 words - 6 pages Aldous Huxley’s Brave New Word was a revolutionary book when it was published in 1969. Huxley wrote about scientific and technological advances, then considered absurd. Huxley described a revolutionary drug called Soma, which is the reason civilized society was considered civilized. Soma kept people from holding grudges and feeling anger. Societal problems did not exist. The drug made all unpleasant feelings disappear. Soma was happiness in a

Analytical review of Aldous Huxley's "BRAVE NEW WORLD" ... explaining through the use of literary techniques such as satire and irony

1248 words - 5 pages unpublished novel at the age of seventeen. In 1932, Huxley wrote Brave New World, one of the most challenged books in English classrooms between 1990 and 2000.Written while he was living in France and England, Brave New World was Huxley's first attempt at a utopian novel, a "negative utopia" as he referred to it. He was inspired by H.G. Wells' optimistic vision of the future in "Men Like Gods" to write a complete parody of that same novel, one where he

Similar Essays

Aldous Huxley's Brave New World Essay

1472 words - 6 pages Aldous Huxley's Brave New World I stood in front of the television screen in horror and disbelief at 10 o'clock on September 11, 2001. Watching as the second plane struck the World Trade Center in a fiery ball of destruction, I thought for sure that this world as we know it was coming to an abrupt end. Seeing the first tower fall and then the second, with over 100 stories each now a pile of twisted steel and death made me want to

Aldous Huxley's Brave New World Essay

1535 words - 7 pages Bedford, Sybille. Aldous Huxley: A Biography. New York, NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004.print Brander, Laurence. Aldous Huxley: A Critical Study. Lewisburg, PA.: Bucknell University Press, 1970. Print Firchow, Peter. Aldous Huxley: Satirist and Novelist. Minneapolis, MN.: University of Minnesota Press, 1972. Print Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World: And, Brave New World Revisited. New York: Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2005. Print. Postman, Neil. Technopoly: The Surrender of Culture to Technology. New York, NY: Vintage Books, 1993. Print Watts, Harold H. Aldous Huxley. New York, NY: Twayne, 2009. Print

Aldous Huxley's Brave New World Essay

1128 words - 5 pages How valuable is the protection of individuality? In a society dominated by falsified, scientifically manufactured happiness, individuality proves a rarity. Aldous Huxley’s speculative novel, Brave New World, demonstrates the consequences of this type of impassive society. Bernard, Helmholtz, and John are all unique from their peers, and they think individually as a result. Because of their individuality, the group is ultimately banned from

Aldous Huxley's Brave New World Essay

2312 words - 10 pages . Here we see the amount of control Mustapha Mond has over the World State; being the ultimate ruler of the society he has control over public knowledge. Through this, he maintains social stability as he states here, “as the present social order is concerned, dangerous and potentially subversive.” (117) V. Thesis A dystopian novel, such as Brave New World, is usually centered on the conflict between man and society. In this case, Aldous Huxley tells