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Sherlock Holmes Genre Essay

959 words - 4 pages

Arthur Conan Doyle began his mystery series of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes in 1891. The first short story he published is called, “A Scandal in Bohemia”. Nearly 100 years later the story was adapted into a television episode that was a part of a larger series of stories; 30 years later, in 2012, another television series was created. The modern television version of the original Sherlock Holmes story, “A Scandal in Bohemia, “A Scandal in Belgravia”, deviates from the traditional mystery genre, by adding its own concepts to the mystery, including: connected deception and an unpredictable resolution with the ultimate purpose of leading the audience astray.
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The evidence that is used to retrieve the photos from Irene is just Sherlocks pure observation. Though he used his observation and cleverness to find the photos, he has to rely on his observation and inferences to solve the case. This episode conforms to the characteristics of a mystery in this aspect.
However the modern television version, “A Scandal in Belgravia”, deviates from the typical mystery. The story actually develops its own subgenre, connected deception, or simply organized trickery. Organized trickery requires similar characteristics to a mystery, however it does have its own unique characteristics. As the story progresses there are multiple little events and actions that come to the surface, and in the end you realize that there was a purpose for all the details; all of them working together to make the ending clear. Irene Adler spends months using organized trickery just to get Sherlock to decode a message that she then uses to transfer a message to Moriarity, a criminal mastermind. The way the deception works, is that the mystery is presented in a different way than it usually is. It begins with Sherlock and Watson finding the photos, it then shifts to the mystery as to how Sherlock could unlock the camera phone that Irene Adler has left him as part of her plan. A mystery is typically presented as a crime or a problem being solved. Though there are multiple investigations taking place, but they are all based on one goal; to get the information off of the camera phone.
The deception is not the only twist, that this episode explores. As the story of the deception develops, an unpredictable resolution is formed. With the complexity of the deceptions it is difficult for the audience to be able to predict how the story will conclude. The resolution stems from...

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