Siddhartha's Journey Of Self Actualization In Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha

657 words - 3 pages

Samantha Murillo
Period 5
AP English

Siddhartha
In “Siddhartha” by Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha is put to the test to find inner enlightenment while trying to discover himself. He must work through the hardships and overcome loosing himself along the way.
Siddhartha began his adolescence with learning the ways of Brahman in hopes to find enlightenment by following the footsteps of his father. He lived along with his best friend Govinda but slowly grew discontent with his life. He felt empty and was hungry for something new. “that the wise Brahmans already revealed to him the most and the best of their wisdom, that they had already filled his expecting vessel with their richness, and the vessel was not full, the spirit was not content, the soul was not calm, the heart was not satisfied” (page 6). Siddhartha was in search of a more refreshing spiritual fulfillment, which resulted in his decision to become a samana. After years of meditation and fasting once again he felt like he was missing something.
Govinda and Siddhartha were in search to find a well spoken about Buddha named Gotama known as the “the one”. Govinda soon joins the Buddha but Siddhartha expresses his real opinion on Gotamas teachings “not to seek other, better teachings, for I know there are none, but to depart from all teachings and all teachers and to reach my goal by myself or to die” (page 28) Siddhartha realizes that teachers can’t help satisfy him, he must search on his own. He then moved on to the big city but was caught by the looks of kamala. Soon he began to get lessons of love from her. Kamala urged riches were the best option convincing Siddhartha to become a merchant. Since learning the ways of a samana Siddhartha has learned three basic essentials: to think fast, and have patience. This is what gave him the opportunity to become a...

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