This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Similarities Between Native Son By Richard Wright And Frankenstein By Mary Shelley

1971 words - 8 pages

When reading the novels Native Son by Richard Wright and Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, the reader can recognize various similarities throughout the novels. The reader can see similarities between the character Bigger Thomas from Native Son and the creature from Frankenstein. Also, the character Buddy Thomas relates to the creature in the beginning of the novel, Frankenstein. In addition, both novels have a character that has negatively warped a younger character-- namely Mr. Dalton and Victor Frankenstein. The novel’s various similar characters reveal an undying interest in society’s role in warping the innocence of people.
In Native Son, the character Bigger Thomas is highly oppressed and treated as an outcast in society. This relationship with society is nearly identical to that of the creature in Frankenstein. Bigger Thomas did not choose which race he would be born as, nor did he chose to live in a time of oppression. Despite all this, Bigger is still treated as inferior to white people all throughout the novel. After being raised in an environment in which he was told he would never be able to amount to his dreams, Bigger eventually stretches past his limits and becomes enraged. He uses his anger to rationalize his view of the accidental murder of Mary Dalton. When Bigger’s girlfriend tells him that he will be accused of raping Mary, Bigger thinks:
Had he raped her? Yes, he had raped her. Every time he felt as he had felt that night, he raped. But rape was not what one did to women. Rape was what one felt when one’s back was against a wall and one had to strike out, whether one wanted to or not, to keep the pack from killing one. He committed rape every time he looked into a white face. He was a long, taut piece of rubber which a thousand white hands had stretched to the snapping point, and when he snapped it was rape. But it was rape when he cried out in hate deep in his heart as he felt the strain of living day by day. That, too, was rape. (Book Two)
Bigger feels as if he was forced to act out against white society due to their abuse of him and his culture. Just like Bigger, the creature from Frankenstein feels the pressures and criticisms of society. The creature is forced to the outskirts of society because of his unnatural appearance. However, just like Bigger, the creature did not chose his appearance, nor did he choose his creation. Even though both characters did not choose their appearance, their appearance is what ultimately decides how society will treat them. When people refuse to accept the creature, the creature becomes aggressive and responds violently just as Bigger does with Mary and Bessie. In Frankenstein, the creature looks upon William Frankenstein, notices that he is carrying a picture of a woman, and says:
I remembered that I was forever deprived of the delights that such beautiful creatures could bestow and that she whose resemblance I contemplated would, in regarding me, have changed that...

Find Another Essay On Similarities Between Native Son by Richard Wright and Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley Essay

1344 words - 5 pages The world consists of people that have the ability to overcome evil or become consumed in it. In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, a creature believed to be monstrous and destructive is created and as a consequence despised by the society he is brought into. Through the perspectives of Walton, Frankenstein, and the creature, Mary Shelley counters Frankenstein’s belief that the creature is a ‘demon’. The creature exemplifies more heartfelt

Analysis of Bigger Thomas in Native Son by Richard Wright

943 words - 4 pages only depicts Bigger Thomas, but also puts a critical/harsh eye on the White community. Richard Wright displays in his novel, Native Son, that the protagonist, Bigger, is a monstrous symbol of what can happen if society refuses to make freedom and opportunity available to all people. Violence, poverty, and racism were inevitable and the determining factors for people, especially Bigger during the 40’s. Bigger Thomas was “damaged by racism and

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

4782 words - 19 pages Frankenstein by Mary Shelley FRANKENSTEIN ‘Frankenstein is full of ideas and warnings which are relevant to a modern audience.’ -Discuss the enduring appeal of the novel. Introduction: Despite being over a century old, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein has continued to hold public interest for nearly two hundred years. The novel was published 1818 and is one of the most acclaimed gothic stories

Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley

1224 words - 5 pages committed such a vile act upon humanity. “A being whom myself had formed, and eluded with life, had met me at midnight among the precipices of an inaccessible mountain.”(Frankenstein, Mary Shelley) Victor may have admitted to creating the monster, but he denied that he had driven the monster to commit murder. He needed to admit, not only to himself, but to his family that he was the one responsible for William’s murder. By not admitting this

"Frankenstein" by Mary Shelley

2463 words - 10 pages life.Racism is an obvious similarity between Frankenstein's society and that of today. These similarities are displayed the moment that the monster is brought into this world. The hideous figure, the disfigured stature of this monster is the first thing noticed by Victor Frankenstein in Chapter 5. "His (the creator's) yellow skin scarcely covered the work of muscles" (pg. 45). This reference to the monster's yellow skin depicts the same behaviour

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

1483 words - 6 pages good of mankind. However both men fail to recognise the consequences that arise from their actions, but where Prometheus is punished by the Gods, Frankenstein is tormented by his very own creation for forming “a monster so hideous that even you turned from me in disgust”. It is apparent that Mary Shelley wrote the novel as a kind of warning to the many scientists and radicals at the time of publication, and to raise awareness about the

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

1339 words - 6 pages The novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley was written in the era of Romanticism which occurred between the eighteenth to the nineteenth century as a direct stance against The Age of Enlightenment. This particular historical time elevated both science and reason to be the ultimate goal. In contrast, the Romantic Movement namely aimed towards having intuition dominate reason and consider nature as a healing place for humans to flee urbanization and

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley - 1292 words

1292 words - 5 pages Archetypal Characters inside Frankenstein The novel “Frankenstein” by Mary Shelley involves the complex issues with the creation of life through an inanimate life. Shelley uses these character archetypes to develop a deeper meaning of the characters intentions. Shelley does an excellent job at allowing the reader to have a peak at the characters inner thoughts and feelings. The archetypes presented in Frankenstein allow readers to

Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley

1409 words - 6 pages attention during the analysis of Frankenstein. Victor acts as a God-like figure as he creates life in the most unnatural way; which naturally contradicts this set of beliefs. This ideology is solidified within Mary Poovey’s essay regarding Shelley’s influence on Romanticism and feminism. “Shelley explodes the foundations of Romantic optimism by demonstrating the egotistical energies necessary to self-assertion – energies that appear to be at the

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

1689 words - 7 pages Press; Great Britain; 2003. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/books/article-2289686/For-Daphne-man-lived-Daddy-DAPHNE-DU-MAURIER-AND-HER-SISTERS-THE-HIDDEN-LIVES-OF-PIFFY-BIRD-AND-BING-BY-JANE-DUNN.html; John Preston; 2013. Patterson, Paul; Frankenstein’s Self-Centeredness Leads Inevitably to Self-Destruction; The Greenhaven Press; San Diego; 2000. Shelley, Mary; Frankenstein; Wordsworth Editions Limited; Hertfordshire; 1993. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebecca_(novel)

Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley - 1167 words

1167 words - 5 pages Knowledge accompanied by wisdom, is a blessing. Knowledge helped scientists. make the most destructive weapon known to mankind, a nuclear bomb. It was lack of wisdom that caused United States of America to use it as a means of mass destruction, as illustrated in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Knowledge not accompanied by wisdom, is a curse. Victor Frankenstein, protagonist in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, is awed by the science of chemistry and

Similar Essays

Native Son, By Richard Wright Essay

862 words - 3 pages Native Son, by Richard Wright, was hailed by reviewers as an instant classic upon its release in 1940. The novel was an instant bestseller, having been included in the book-of-the-month-club. Due to its proto revolutionary themes it was the subject of many reviews. Two such reviewers are Clifton Fadiman and Malcolm Cowley.         Clifton Fadiman, writer for The New Yorker declared that Native Son was the most powerful American novel

Native Son By Richard Wright Essay

1660 words - 7 pages the true social construct of black men in his novel called Native Son. Wright tells the story of what it meant to be black in Chicago in the 1930’s, through the main character Bigger Thomas. Moreover, he displays the meaning of being a black male in society. There are many powerful themes throughout the novel but one of most significant is the way white America is much like a prison to the mind and body, for black people. Bigger Thomas, alike

Native Son By Richard Wright Essay

2400 words - 10 pages Native Son by Richard Wright Who is the victim in a prejudiced civilization? The dominant group or the minority? "Native Son," a

"Native Son", By Richard Wright Essay Title: Bigger's Progression

1105 words - 4 pages Throughout Native Son, by Richard Wright, Bigger Thomas, the protagonist, transforms from a hateful and violent rebel to an understanding, transcendental person. Right from the start, Bigger was a person who had little control over his life and his actions. His life was mainly controlled by his mother, who would encourage Bigger to go out and get a legible job in order to support the family. Bigger's actions were controlled by his fear, as he